The Center for Cooperative Research
U:     P:    
Not registered yet? Register here
 
Search
 
Current timeline only
Advanced Search


Main Menu
Home 
History Engine Sub-Menu
Timelines 
Entities 
Forum 
Miscellaneous Sub-Menu
Donate 
Links 
End of Main Menu

Volunteers Needed!
Submit a timeline entry
Donate: If you think this site is important, please help us out financially. We need your help!
Email updates
 



  View mode (info):
  Ordering (info):
  Time period (info):

General Topic Areas

Rendition (35)
legalProceedings (41)
Human Rights Groups (45)
Coverup (48)
Impunity (21)
Prisoner deaths (20)
High-level decisions and actions (131)
Indications of Abuse (36)
Statements/writings about torture (8)
Public statements (53)
Detainments
Independent investigations (1)
Reports/Investigations (41)
Suicides (1)
Private contractors (4)
Criticisms of US (41)
Indefinate Detention (3)
Military commissions (32)
Disciplinary actions (15)
Supreme Court Decisions (4)
Media (26)
Aftermath (14)

Types of abuses performed by Americans

Use of dogs (11)
Forced confessions (9)
Mental abuse (7)
Sexual humiliation (34)
Physical assault (73)
Stress positions (22)
Electrodes (3)
Intimidation/threats (22)
Sleep deprivation (23)
Poor conditions (18)
Suppression Religion (7)
Medical services denied (7)
Abrogation of rights (7)
Involuntary drugs (4)
Deception (1)
Isolation (16)
Extreme temperatures (16)
Insufficient food (11)
Dangerous conditions (5)
Ghost detainees (5)
Sexual temptation (2)

Documents

Presidential directives (3)
Internal memos/reports (33)

Specific Events

Qala-i-Janghi massacre (20)

US Bases and Interrogation Centers

Guantanamo (141)
Abu Ghraib (145)
Camp Cropper (10)
Camp Bucca (8)
Camp Rhino (2)
Ariana (1)
Al Jafr (5)
Bagram (40)
Camp Iron Horse (1)
Fire Base Tycze (1)
BIF (1)
LSA Diamondback (1)
Diego Garcia (3)
Asadabad (1)
Kandahar (18)
USS Peleliu (3)
USS Bataan (1)
Sheberghan (1)
Gardez (2)
Far' Falastin (5)
Sednaya (1)
Al Qaim (4)
Palestine Street Base (1)
US Base at Adhamiya (3)
Kabul (2)
Kohat (1)
Jalalabad (1)
Camp Whitehorse (2)
Packhorse (1)

People who have been detained

John Walker Lindh (32)
Maher Arar (11)
Abdullah (1)
Amanullah (1)
Jose Padilla (13)
Yaser Esam Hamdi (21)
Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi (2)
Jamal Udeen (10)
Ali Sale Kayla al-Marri (5)
Mohamed al Chastaini (1)
Tarek Dergoul (11)
Ahmed Agiza (2)
Muhammed Al-Zery (2)
Abdul Razaq (2)
Noor Aghah (1)
Mohammed Saad Iqbal Madni (5)
6 men in Bosnia (4)
Mohammed Saghir (1)
Mohamedou Oulad Slahi (1)
Mamdouh Habib (4)
Jamil Qasim Saeed Mohammed (1)
Mohammed Haydar Zammar (2)
Talaat Fouad Qassem (1)
5 men in Albania (1)
Sayed Abassin (3)
Omar al-Faruq (1)
Mullah Habibullah (2)
Dilawar (4)
Abdul Qayyum (1)
Saif ur-Rahman (1)
Khreisan Khalis Aballey (1)
Abdallah Khudhran al-Shamran (1)
Abd al-Rahman (1)
Najem Sa'doun Hattab (2)
Ibrahim Habaci (3)
Arif Ulusam (3)
Faha al Bahli (3)
Mahmud Sardar Issa (3)
Khalifa Abdi (3)
Saeed Abou Taleb (1)
Sohail Karimi (1)
Adil Al-Jazeeri (1)
Abed Hamed Mowhoush (4)
Saddam Salah al-Rawi (8)
Manadel al-Jamadi (3)
Bisher al-Rawi (4)
Jamil al-Banna (4)
Abdullah El-Janoudi (2)
Zakhim Shah (1)
Wahab al-Rawi (1)
Abdur Rahim (1)
Parkhudin (1)
Wazir Muhammad (2)
Mohammed Ismail Agha (1)
Abdurahman Khadr (2)
Nurjaman Riduan Isamuddin (1)
Moazzam Begg (7)
Martin Mubanga (4)
Hiwa Abdul Rahman Rashul (3)
Abdul Wali (1)
Ala' Jassem Sa'ad (1)
Mohamed al-Khatani (4)
Saifullah Paracha (2)
David Hicks (3)
Feroz Abbasi (3)
Salim Ahmed Hamdan (6)
Ali Hamza Ahmad Sulayman al-Bahlul (2)
Ibrahim Ahmed Mahmoud al-Qosi (2)
Adullah Almalk (1)
Ameen Saeed al-Sheikh (1)
Amjed Isail Waleed (2)
Haj Ali Shallal Abbas (1)
Abd Alwhab Youss (1)
Huda al-Azzawi (10)
Abdou Hussain Saad Faleh (1)
Assad (3)
Nori al-Yasseri (1)
Hussein Mohssein Mata al-Zayiadi (1)
Haidar (1)
Ahmed (1)
Ahzem (1)
Hashiem (1)
Mustafa (1)
Nahla al-Azzawi (4)
Ayad al-Azzawi (3)
Ali al-Azzawi (5)
Mu'taz al-Azzawi (4)
Khalid el-Masri (5)
Mehdi Ghezali (5)
Adil (1)
Abu Abdul Rahman (3)
Mourad Benchellali (1)
Nizar Sassi (2)
Imad Kanouni (1)
Brahim Yadel (1)
Hamed Abderrahman Ahmed (1)
Yasin Qasem Muhammad Ismail (1)
Khalid Abdullah Mishal al-Mutairi (1)
Fawzi Khalid Abdullah Fahad al-Odah (1)
Wael Kishk (1)
Ashraf Ibrahim (1)
A.Z. (1)
Mohammad Naim (1)
Sherbat Naim (1)
Ahmadullah (1)
Amadullah (0)
Muhammad Naim Farooq (1)
Wesam Abdulrahman Ahmed Al Deemawi (1)
Hussein Abdelkadr Youssouf Mustafa (3)
Shafiq Rasul (20)
Rhuhel Ahmed (21)
Asif Iqbal (21)
Khoja Mohammad (1)
Jamaal Belmar (1)
Haji Rohullah Wakil (1)
Abu Zubaida (1)
Alif Khan (2)
Ibrahim Fauzee (1)
Shah Mohammed (1)
Khalid Shaikh Mohammed (2)
Sahim Alwan (3)
Mukhtar al-Bakri (3)
Faysal Galab (3)
Yahya Goba (3)
Yaseinn Taher (3)
Abdul Jabar (1)
Mullah Rocketti (1)
Mohammed Ahmed al-Kandari (1)
Thamir Issawi (0)
Haydar Sabbar Abed (1)
Abd al-Rahim al Nashiri (1)
Jan Baz Khan (1)
Unnamed prisoners (42)
Click here to join: Suggest changes to existing data, add new data to the website, or compile your own timeline. More Info >>

 

Torture, rendition, and other abuses against captives in Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere

 
  

Project: Prisoner abuse in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

Export to XML Printer Friendly View Email to a Friend Increase Text Size Decrease Text Size


September 27, 2001

       Mohamedou Oulad Slahi, a Mauritanian businessman and alleged liaison between Islamic radicals in Hamburg and Osama bin Laden, is arrested in Mauritania by secret police, his family says. By December, he will be in US custody. He will later be housed at a secret CIA facility within Camp Echo at the Guantanamo Bay Naval Station. [Washington Post, 12/17/2004]
People and organizations involved: Mohamedou Oulad Slahi
          

December 2001

       Mehdi Ghezali, a Muslim Swede, is arrested by Pakistani police and handed over to US authorities. According to an account provided by Ghezali in 2004, he was kidnapped by Pakistani villagers shortly after crossing into Pakistan from Afghanistan where he was visiting a friend. The villagers sold him to the Pakistani police who then gave him to the Americans. He was then flown back to Afghanistan. [Agence France-Presse, 7/14/2004; Reuters, 7/14/2004]
People and organizations involved: Mehdi Ghezali
          

December 2001-January 2002

       Tarek Dergoul and two Pakistani friends, who arrived in Afghanistan shortly after 9/11 (see Shortly After September 11, 2001) to purchase houses, stay in the Afghan town of Jalalabad. That night, the house where they are sleeping is bombed, and Dergoul's friends are killed in the blast. Dergoul goes outside when another bomb explodes nearby, wounding him with shrapnel. He then lies among the ruins, unable to walk, for at least a week. His left arm, hit with shrapnel, is severely damaged and a large part will later be amputated. At night the cold is so severe that his toes turn black from frostbite. Eventually, troops loyal to the Northern Alliance find him, treat him well and take him to a hospital where he undegoes three operations. But after five weeks, someone decides to make a profit on him. Dergoul is taken to an airfield, where a US helicopter arrives to pick him up. His captors are paid the standard fee of $5,000, according to Dergoul. From there, he is flown to the US air base at Bagram. [The Observer, 5/16/2004]
People and organizations involved: Mohamed al-Khatani
          

December 2001

       Yaser Esam Hamdi, who holds dual Saudi and US citizenship, is captured in Afghanistan by the Northern Alliance and handed over to US forces. According to the US government, at the time of his arrest, Hamdi carries a Kalashnikov assault rifle and is traveling with a Taliban military unit. The following month he will be transferred to Guantanamo [CNN, 10/14/2004]
People and organizations involved: Yaser Esam Hamdi
          

December 2001

       Saudi national Mohamed al-Chastain is captured at the Pakistani-Afghan border and transferred to US authorities. [White House, 6/22/2004] His identity and nationality are at this time unknown.
People and organizations involved: Mohamed al-Khatani
          

December 15, 2001

       Ali Sale Kayla al-Marri, from Qatar but a legal US resident, is detained for questioning in the county jail of Peoria, Illinois, on a material witness warrant issued by a grand jury. [Peoria Journal Star, 12/19/2001] The government will later charge him with making false statements to the FBI, and prepare for trial. [Amnesty International, 8/19/2003] Al-Marri is believed to be a relative of Saudi national and future Guantanamo detainee Mohamed al-Chastain. [New York Times, 6/21/2004]
People and organizations involved: Ali Saleh Kahlah al-Mari, Mohamed al-Khatani
          

December 17, 2001

       US intelligence and Pentagon officials admit having lost track of Osama bin Laden in the Tora Bora area in the Northwest of Afghanistan. “The chatter stopped,” says John Stufflebeem. According to commanders of the Northern Alliance, as many as 500 al-Qaeda members might still be at large. [St. Petersburg Times, 12/18/2001] The same day, Rumsfeld says he has heard that there were 30 or 31 persons being held in custody around Tora Bora as of December 16. It is unclear whether any high-ranking al-Qaeda members are among them. Meanwhile, a detention center is being built at Kandahar. [Associated Press, 12/17/2001]
People and organizations involved: Osama bin Laden, Donald Rumsfeld, John Stufflebeem
          

December 27, 2001

       Rumsfeld makes a public announcement that he is planning to move Taliban and al-Qaeda suspects to the Guantanamo Bay Naval Station. The number of people in US custody and destined for Guantanamo is allegedly small. According to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Air Force Gen. Richard B. Myers, they number eight individuals aboard the USS Peleliu and thrity-seven at a US base near Kandahar airport. [Dawn Newspapers, 12/28/2001] Troops, earlier stationed at nearby Camp Rhino, where Lindh was detained, are being transferred to Guantanamo. [Global Security Website, 1/15/2005] The reason for choosing Guantanamo for detaining suspected al-Qaeda and Taliban members is unclear. Rumsfeld says, “I would characterize Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, as the least worst place we could have selected. Its disadvantages seem to be modest relative to the alternatives.” [Dawn Newspapers, 12/28/2001]
People and organizations involved: Richard B. Myers, Donald Rumsfeld
          

Early 2002

       A Pakistani man, referred to as “A.Z.,” is detained at Kandahar. According to his account, he is beaten while having his hands cuffed behind his back. “They made me lie down on a table with my face down, while two persons held me, one at my neck and the second at my feet. Both pressed me down hard on the table, and two others beat me on my back, my thighs and my arms with punches and their elbows. The beating lasted five or six minutes. Then the interrogations started.” The man is later sent to Guantanamo and released in 2003. [Human Rights Watch, 2004]
People and organizations involved: A.Z.
          

Early January, 2002

       Tim Reid, a journalist from the Times of London, visits the Kandahar city jail and meets with Jamal Udeen (see October 2001), formerly a prisoner of the Taliban, four times in one week. Udeen is still trying to find a way back to the UK. His four fellow inmates are a Russian from Tartarstan, two Saudi Arabians and a Syrian Kurd; all free to go, but waiting for an opportunity. Udeen tells Reid resolutely that he was not in Afghanistan to fight for the Taliban or al-Qaeda. “If I came here to fight, I wouldn't have been thrown in prison,” he argues. “I travel all the time. That is all I was doing.” Reid later says: “I felt sure he was no terrorist. I even tried to get him released.” [The Times, 3/11/2004]
People and organizations involved: Jamal Udeen, Tim Reid
          

January-June 2002

       More than 140 suspected Taliban and al-Qaeda members are transferred to an alleged US detention center in Kohat, Pakistan. According to one report, the Pakistani army is responsible for maintaining the external security of the prison, while US officials are responsible for security inside. As at Bagram, US officials interrogate prisoners in order to determine who should be transferred to Guantanamo Bay. According to Javed Ibrahim Paracha of the Pakistan Muslim League (Nawaz), prisoners at Kohat are shackled and dressed only in shorts. Detainees are transferred in military planes only under the cover of night. [Human Rights First, 6/2004]
People and organizations involved: Javed Ibrahim Paracha
          

End of 2002

       Wazir Muhammad, a 31-year-old farmer turned taxi driver from Khost province in Afghanistan, is detained and taken to Bagram. At the time of his arrest, he was working and had four passengers with him in his taxi. During his time at Bagram, he is interrogated, prohibited from talking to other prisoners, and deprived of sleep through the use of loudspeakers. He is later sent to Kandahar and eventually to Guantanamo (see Beginning of 2004). [The Guardian, 6/23/2004]
People and organizations involved: Wazir Muhammad
          

January 2002 and after

       Pakistan turns Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi, a Libyan national, over to US authorities. Libi is believed to have run the Khaldan paramilitary camp in Afghanistan for al-Qaeda. Interrogations start and a debate soon erupts with regard to which methods can be employed. The CIA advocates threatening him with his life and that of his family. [Washington Post, 6/27/2004] The CIA's actions are, according to Newsweek, facilitated by a February 2002 secret presidential order “authorizing the CIA to establish secret detention facilities outside the US and to use extra harsh interrogation methods” (see After February 7, 2002). [Newsweek, 5/24/2004] Some time after his handover to the US, Al-Libi is rendered to Egypt. According to an ex-FBI official, the CIA “duct-taped his mouth, cinched him up and sent him to Cairo. At the airport the CIA case officer goes up to him and says, ‘You're going to Cairo, you know. Before you get there I'm going to find your mother and I'm going to f_ck her.’ ” [Newsweek, 6/21/2004] Al-Libi is said to provide the US with valuable intelligence including information about an alleged plot to blow up the US Embassy in Yemen with a truck bomb and the location of Abu Zubaida, who will be captured in March 2002 (see March 28, 2002). However, he will also provide false information (see February 14, 2004) that will end up in major speeches by both President Bush (see October 7, 2002) and Secretary of State Colin Powell (see 10:30 a.m. February 5, 2003). The FBI has thus far taken the lead in interrogations of terrorist suspects, because its agents are the ones with most experience. The CIA's success with Al-Libi contributes to the shift of interrogations from the bureau to the CIA. [Washington Post, 6/27/2004] Such methods as making death threats, advocated by the CIA, are opposed by the FBI, which is used to limiting its questioning techniques so the results from interrogations can be used in court. [Washington Post, 6/27/2004] “We don't believe in coercion,” a senior FBI official says. [The Guardian, 9/13/2004]
People and organizations involved: Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi
          

January 17, 2002

       After three months, none of the allegations that the US made against the six men arrested in Bosnia in October 2001 (see October 2001) has be proven and the Supreme Court of the Muslim-Croat Federation orders their release. The US refused to provide evidence in court that the men were tied to al-Qaeda, as alleged. After the Supreme Court's ruling, the Human Rights Chamber for Bosnia-Herzegovina (BiH) says that four of the six men cannot be expelled from the country until it has ruled on their appeal against the retraction of their citizenship. A hearing is scheduled for February 11. But it will never come to that. [CNN, 1/18/2004; Washington Post, 5/11/2004; BBC, 1/22/2002]
          

January 18, 2002

       Bosnian police turn five Algerians and a Yemeni over to US authorities, hours before they are to be released. The men were acquitted by Bosnia's Human Rights Chamber after the United States had refused to provide evidence in court that the men were tied to al-Qaeda (see January 17, 2002). US soldiers whisk the men off from their Sarajevo prison cells and fly them to Guantanamo Bay. According to Karen Williams, a spokeswoman for the US embassy in Sarajevo, the whole operation was lawful. “The Bosnian government opted to deport some of its citizens,” she says, “and the US said it would accept them.” [BBC, 1/22/2002; Washington Post, 5/11/2004; CNN, 1/18/2004] However, according to Rasim Kadic, a former head of BiH's antiterrorist task force, his government had no choice. “We had to practically sign them away. The presence of US soldiers here is a guarantee for Bosnia for a long time to come, and we have to pay a price.” [New York Times, 10/22/2004] Others are less understanding. The representative of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights in BiH, Madeleine Rees, is highly critical of the US and BiH governments, saying: “This was an extrajudicial removal from sovereign territory.” An official said the Human Rights Chamber was “outraged.” “It was a scandal. The Americans invented the chamber, they came up with the goals—such as the rule of law and human rights—and then they tell the Muslim-Croat Federation government not to care. This undermines everything the Americans do, and everything they financed.” [BBC, 1/22/2002]
People and organizations involved: Rasim Kadic, Karen Williams, Madeleine Ree
          

January 24, 2002

       US forces attack two government buildings in Khas Uruzgan, a village in the Afghan province of Uruzgan, and kill several anti-Taliban fighters and government employees by mistake. They also take 27 of them into custody and detain them for several days at the Kandahar air base. A number of these detainees claim they are kicked and punched repeatedly by US soldiers after their arrival, causing bone fractions that are left untreated. An elderly man allegedly has his hand broken. Some are beaten until they are unconscious. A photojournalist tells Human Rights Watch that US Special Forces refer to the Kandahar base as “Camp Slappy.” [Human Rights Watch, 2004]
          

January 26, 2002

       Two days after receiving assurances from the British Consulate that he would soon be returning home (see January 24, 2002), Jamal Udeen is taken by undercover CIA agents to the US air base at Kandahar airport. The next day, reporter Tim Reid, who was planning to accompany Udeen back to Britain, discovers he is too late. He finds that the four other foreign prisoners (see Early January, 2002) at the Taliban jail have also been arrested. [The Times, 3/11/2004] Udeen later describes the air base as “a concentration camp,” with watchtowers and barbed wire. [The Mirror, 3/12/2004] Udeen and the other four prisoners will all end up at the Guantanamo facility in Cuba. Udeen will not be released until March 2004. [The Times, 3/11/2004]
People and organizations involved: Tim Reid, Jamal Udeen
          

January 31, 2002

       Moazzam Begg is arrested by Pakistani officials in his home in Islamabad, Pakistan. In a phone call he is able to make to his father, he says US officials are also present. Shortly thereafter, Pakistani lawyers file a habeas petition on his behalf in a Pakistani court. [Sources: Petition for writ of habeas corpus for Moazzam Begg and Feroz Abbasi, 7/2/2004]
People and organizations involved: Moazzam Begg
          

February 15, 2002

       Egyptian national Wael Kishk, who uses a wheelchair, complains to a judge in open court about mistreatment at the Brooklyn Metropolitan Detention Center (MDC). Following his court appearance, during his transport back to the center, guards throw him face down onto the floor of the bus. Kishk is unable to break his fall because his hands are tied behind his back and his ankles are shackled. Back at the MDC, four guards “started stomping on me,” he later reports from Cairo. “They took all my clothes off and turned me on my stomach. Then, the leader put his foot on the back of my neck and told me, ‘All of this is so you will stop playing games.’ ” This latter remark, Kishk takes to be a reference to his complaints. Kishk and another Egyptian, Ashraf Ibrahim, will say they were also subjected to strip searches and that guards painfully grabbed their genitals. [New York Daily News, 2/20/2005]
People and organizations involved: Wael Kishk, Ashraf Ibrahim
          

Spring 2002

       Martin Mubanga, who holds dual British and Zambian citizenship, and his sister Constance Mubanga are arrested in Zambia “on false charges of motor vehicle theft,” according to his lawyers. After a detention of several weeks, Zambian authorities send Constance to the UK, but turn Martin over to the US government, “without due process and in violation of the laws of Zambia ....” Martin is subsequently flown to Guantanamo, [Sources: Petition for writ of habeas corpus for Bisher al-Rawi, Jamil el-Banna and Martin Mubanga, 7/8/2004] where he arrives on April 20, 2002. [Independent, 8/8/2004]
People and organizations involved: Martin Mubanga
          

March 7, 2002-March 14, 2002

       According to a later habeas petition, a Pakistani court orders the Pakistani interior minister to produce Moazzam Begg before the court on March 7, which the minister refuses to do. On March 14, the court again orders the minister to produce Begg, this time under threat of sanctions. Again, the interior minister refuses to comply with the order. Meanwhile, Begg's lawyer Abdur Rahman Saddiqui claims that Pakistan's intelligence agency (ISI) and the CIA have captured Begg and that the ISI is interrogating him. Perhaps by this point, Begg has already been sent to Afghanistan. [Sources: Petition for writ of habeas corpus for Moazzam Begg and Feroz Abbasi, 7/2/04]
People and organizations involved: Moazzam Begg
          

March 15, 2002

       Wesam Abdulrahman Ahmed al-Deemawi, a Jordanian national, is detained at the Bagram air base in Afghanistan for a period of 40 days. During this time, he is threatened with dogs, stripped naked, and photographed “in shameful and obscene positions.” In an affidavit, he alleges he is hung for two days from a hook inside a cage, while blindfolded. Occasionally he is given “breaks” of an hour. [The Guardian, 2/18/2005]
People and organizations involved: Wesam Abdulrahman Ahmed al-Deemawi
          

March 17, 2002

       US troops raid a compound in Sangesar, a village close to Kandahar, and arrest more than thirty anti-Taliban fighters, presumably by mistake. Taken to Kandahar, they are “thrown down,” face first, onto the ground, by US soldiers. One detainee later recalls: “They picked me up and threw me down on the rocks. It was painful. I couldn't rest on my chest. When I moved they kicked me.” Another says he is held by the feet and head and kicked in the back repeatedly. [Associated Press, 3/23/2002 cited in Human Rights Watch, 2004]
People and organizations involved: Taliban, Human Rights Watch
          

March 28, 2002

       In Faisalabad, Pakistan, a joint team of US and Pakistani Special Forces engage in a firefight with Abu Zubaida, a Palestinian believed to be an al-Qaeda logistics expert. Zubaida is shot, captured, briefly interrogated, and then handed over to US officials. He is then taken to Bagram base in Afghanistan. What happens after that is uncertain, but it is believed that he is flown to Jordan. More high-value prisoners like Zubaida are being held in prisons in Amman and in desert locations in the eastern part of Jordan. [The Observer, 6/13/2004] At all times, Zubaida remains under control of the CIA. The FBI, which until now has competed with the CIA over the lead role in interrogations of terrorist suspects, decides not to have a part in Zubaida's interrogation. A senior FBI counterterrorism official later says, “Once the CIA was given the green light ... they had the lead role.” [Washington Post, 6/27/2004] National Security Adviser for combating terrorism Army Gen. Wayne Downing is apparently intimately involved in the questioning of Zubaida. “The interrogations of Abu Zubaida drove me nuts at times,” he recalls. “He and some of the others are very clever guys. At times I felt we were in a classic counter-interrogation class: They were telling us what they think we already knew. Then, what they thought we wanted to know. As they did that, they fabricated and weaved in threads that went nowhere. But, even with these ploys, we still get valuable information and they are off the street, unable to plot and coordinate future attacks.” Since Zubaida is shot in the groin during his arrest in Pakistan, he requires painkillers. US officials will later suggest to the Washington Post that his painkillers “were used selectively.” One official explains, “in a deadpan voice,” that “pain control [in wounded patients] is a very subjective thing.” [Washington Post, 12/26/2002] As a result, he reportedly shares information leading to the arrest of other al-Qaeda members, [Washington Post, 12/26/2002] including Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, Jose Padilla, [New York Times, 6/27/2004] Ramzi Bin al-Shibh, Rahim al-Nashiri, Omar al-Faruq and Muhammad al-Darbi. [Washington Post, 6/27/2004] Downing, who resigns in June 2002, affirms, “We know so much more about them now than we did a year ago: the personalities, how the networks are established, what they think are important targets, how they think we will react.” [Washington Post, 12/26/2002]
People and organizations involved: Abu Zubaida, Muhammad al-Darbi, Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, Jose Padilla, Wayne Downing, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, Omar al-Faruq, Ramzi Bin al-Shibh
          

April-May 2002

       28-year-old Afghan taxi driver Sayed Abassin is on his way from Kabul to Khost, when he is stopped at a checkpoint at Gardez. One of his passengers is identified as a wanted suspect, and all the occupants in the vehicle, Abassin included, are arrested. At the Gardez police station Abassin is beaten before being turned over to the US military. After a brief interrogation, he is flown by helicopter to the Bagram base. When his father makes inquiries, he is only told that his son has been taken to Bagram. For the first week he is held in shackles and kept in a cell with 24-hour lighting, with the guards waking him up whenever he would fall asleep. He does not get enough to eat and is forced to stand or kneel for four hours a day. A year later he will say he still has problems with his knees. He is interrogated six or seven times. In total, he spends 40 days at Bagram. [Associated Press, 3/15/2003 cited in Amnesty International, 8/19/2003]
People and organizations involved: Sayed Abassin
          

End of May 2002

       US troops raid two houses near Gardez in the village of Kirmati. Five Afghan men are arrested: Mohammad Naim and his brother Sherbat; Ahmadullah and his brother Amanullah; and Khoja Mohammad. They are tied up, blindfolded, and taken to Bagram. “They threw us in a room, face down,” Mohammad Naim later recalls. After a while, they are separated and he is taken to another room and ordered to strip. “They made me take off my clothes, so that I was naked. ... A man came, and he had some plastic bag, and he ran his hands through my hair, shaking my hair. And then he pulled out some of my hair, some hair from my beard, and he put it in a bag.” Human Rights Watch later says it believes this was done to build a DNA-database. Mohammad Naim experiences his treatment as humiliating, especially being photographed naked. “The most awful thing about the whole experience was how they were taking our pictures, and we were completely naked. Completely naked. It was completely humiliating.” Sixteen days later, the five men are released. According to Sherbat, an American apologizes to them and promises they will be receive compensation. “But we never did,” he says a year later. An interpreter gives them the equivalent of 70 US cents to buy tea. When they return, they find their homes looted and most of their valuable possessions gone. On March 10, 2003, almost a year after his release, Ahmadullah says he suffers from continuing anxiety as a result of his experience. “When we were there [at Bagram], I was so afraid they were going to kill me. Even now, having come back, I worry they will come and kill me. ... I have to take medication now just to sleep.” [Human Rights Watch, 2004]
People and organizations involved: Ahmadullah, Khoja Mohammad, Human Rights Watch, Mohammad Naim, Sherbat Naim, Amadullah
          

May 19, 2002

       Maldives national Ibrahim Fauzee is arrested in Karachi where he is a student. For the next eight months, Fauzee's family will know nothing of his fate until January 5, 2003, when they receive a letter delivered through the ICRC. The letter is dated September 15, 2002. The family is told he is being detained at Guantanamo. [Amnesty International, AI Index AMR 51/114/2003, 8/19/2003]
People and organizations involved: Ibrahim Fauzee
          

May 25, 2002

       Palestinian Hussein Abdelkadr Youssouf Mustafa is arrested and spends ten days in the Pakistani Khaibar prison. [The Independent, 1/8/2005]
People and organizations involved: Hussein Abdelkadr Youssouf Mustafa
          

June 4, 2002-early August 2002

       Palestinian Hussein Abdelkadr Youssouf Mustafa, arrested 10 days earlier (see May 25, 2002), is flown from the Pakistani Khaibar prison to Bagram together with 34 other Arab prisoners. They are stripped naked and subjected to stress positions, sleep deprivation, beatings, and humiliation. “They made me stand on one leg in the sun,” he later recalls. “They wouldn't let me sleep for more than two hours. We had only a barrel for a toilet and had to use it in front of everyone.” [The Independent, 1/8/2005] He hears other detainees screaming, who he believes are being beaten. [Mother Jones, 3/2005] The same happens to him. “I was beaten severely,” he claims. He is also doused with cold water and subjected to cold air. “[W]ater was thrown on me before facing an air conditioner,” he will say. [The Independent, 1/8/2005] On one occasion, he later recounts to British journalist Robert Fisk, “an American soldier took me blindfolded. My hands were tightly cuffed, with my ears plugged so I could not hear properly, and my mouth covered so I could only make a muffled scream. Two soldiers, one on each side, forced me to bend down, and a third pressed my face down over a table. A fourth soldier then pulled down my trousers. They rammed a stick up my rectum.” [Mother Jones, 3/2005] Nevertheless, he says, “My torture was even less than what they did to others.” [The Independent, 1/8/2005]
People and organizations involved: Hussein Abdelkadr Youssouf Mustafa
          

September 26, 2002

       On his way home to Montreal, Maher Ara, a 34-year old IT specialist, makes a stopover at JFK International Airport in New York. He is returning alone from a family holiday with his wife and daughter in Tunisia. At the airport, Arar, who was born in Syria and has dual Syrian and Canadian citizenship, is arrested by officers wearing badges from the FBI and the New York Police Department. Arar happens to be on a terrorist watch list. A US official later says Arar has the names of “a large number of known al-Qaeda operatives, affiliates or associates” on him. [Washington Post, 11/19/2003] Canadian Solicitor General Wayne Easter later admits that Canada contributed information that led to Arar's arrest. [Washington Post, 11/20/2003] In an interrogation room Arar asks for an attorney, but, as he later publishes on his website, is “told he has no right to a lawyer because he is not an American citizen.” Subsequent requests for a lawyer are ignored and the interrogation continues until midnight. His interrogators are particularly interested in another Canadian by the name of Abdullah Almalki. Arar says he has worked together with his brother, Nazih Almalki, but knows Abdullah only casually. Then, with his hands and feet in shackles, he is taken to a nearby building and put in a cell around 1 a.m. “I could not sleep,” Arar later writes. “I was very, very scared and disoriented.” [Web Site of Maher Arar, n.d.; Amnesty International, 8/19/2003; CBS News, 1/22/2004; Counterpunch, 11/6/2003; CBC News, 11/26/2004; Washington Post, 5/11/2004]
People and organizations involved: Maher Arar
          

December 2002

       US troops arrest Saif-ur Rahman in the northeastern province of Kunar, Afghanistan, and fly him out by helicopter to Jalalabad. There, according to an account Rahman later provides to Associated Press, he is stripped and doused with ice-cold water. Two US interrogators question him with two dogs. After 24 hours, Rahman is sent to Bagram, where he is deprived of sleep, forced to stand for a long period of time, humiliated by female soldiers who scream abuses at him, and forced to lie on the floor with his arms and legs spread wide and a chair placed on his hands and feet. For 20 days he remains handcuffed. At some point, interrogators threaten to send him to Guantanamo. “One of them brought me 50 small stones and said ‘count these stones.’ When I finished he said, ‘We will send you there for 50 years.’ ” When a military spokesperson is later asked to comment on Rahman's account, the spokesperson says it sounds only partially true (see January 22, 2002). [Associated Press, 3/15/2003]
People and organizations involved: Saif-ur Rahman  Additional Info 
          

Late 2002-February 2004

       Mohammed Ismail Agha, about 14, from the Afghan village of Durabin, is arrested and sent to the Bagram US air base. According to Agha, he was arrested while looking for construction work with a friend at an Afghan military camp in the town of Greshk. Afghan soldiers beat him and then turn him in to the US claiming he is a Taliban soldier. In Bagram, he is held in solitary confinement, interrogated, provided with minimal amounts of food, subjected to stress positions, and prevented from sleeping by guards who continually yell and kick his cell door. He is later sent to Guantanamo, where he is held with two other youths in quarters separate from the adult prisoners. He is finally set free in early 2004. During the first twelve months of his detention, his parents had no idea what had happened to him. Agha was their oldest child and was a major income-earner of the family. [Associated Press, 2/8/2004; Washington Post 2/12/2004]
People and organizations involved: Mohammed Ismail Agha
          

2003

       Nurjaman Riduan Isamuddin, the leader of the Jemaah Islamiyah, a militant Islamic movement in Southeast Asia, is arrested by Thai agents and turned over to their US counterparts. According to the Washington Post, Isamuddin, also known as Hambali, is at some point transferred to the US naval base at the British island colony of Diego Garcia where the CIA is believed to have a secret interrogation center. Isamuddin has been called the “Bin Laden of the Far East.” [The Observer, 6/13/2004; Washington Post, 12/26/2002; Washington Post, 12/17/2004; Washington Post, 1/2/2005; Human Rights First, 6/2004]
People and organizations involved: Nurjaman Riduan Isamuddin
          

January 8, 2003

       The British Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Baroness Valerie Anne Amos, declares there are no prisoners at the US naval base on the island of Diego Garcia. [Sources: Hansard Parliamentary Debates, 3/3/2003, Column 603, Hansard Parliamentary Debates, 1/8/2003] The island of Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean was leased to the US in 1966 for an initial period of 50 years (see December 30, 1966). It now accommodates a US naval base (see June 5, 1975) employing approximately 1,700 military personnel and 2,000 civilian contractors. No one is allowed on the island except for military business. [Diego Garcia Website, n.d.; Human Rights First, 6/2004] However, it has been reported several times in the press that detainees are being held at a CIA interrogation center on the island. Pentagon officials have denied the existence of a CIA interrogation center on the island and the CIA has refused to respond to inquiries about its alleged existence. [Human Rights First, 6/2004; Washington Post, 1/2/2005; Washington Post, 12/26/2002; Washington Post, 12/17/2004]
People and organizations involved: Valerie Anne Amos
          

April 2003-2004

       The US establishes a loose network of prisons and detention centers in Iraq where Iraqi prisoners of war are held and interrogated. Iraqis detained by Coalition Forces are usually first brought to facilities at US military compounds where they are subjected to initial and secondary interrogations, ranging from a period of one week for initial interrogations up to one month for secondary interrogations. During this period, the detainees are not permitted to contact relatives or seek legal counsel. The prisoners are then sent to one of ten major Coalition prison facilities, at which point their names and information are supposed to be entered into the Coalition's central database. The major facilities include: Abu Ghraib Prison (Baghdad Central Correctional Facility or BCCF), the largest; Camp Bucca, in Umm Qasr; Talil Air force Base (Whitford Camp), located south of Baghdad; Al-Rusafa (formerly the Deportations' Prison or Tasfirat), in Baghdad; Al-Kadhimiyya, in Baghdad, for women only; Al-Karkh, in Baghdad, for juveniles only; Al-Diwaniyya Security Detainee Holding Area; the Tikrit detention facility; the Mosul detention facility; and MEK (Ashraf Camp), near al-Ramadi. [Human Rights Watch, 5/7/2004]
          

April 2003-2004

       Captured supected “insurgents” and other militants are brought to the ultra-secret Battlefield Interrogation Facilities (BIF) in Baghdad run by Delta Force. NBC will report that “it is the scene of the most egregious violations of the Geneva Conventions in all of Iraq's prisons.” BIF is described as a “place where the normal rules of interrogation don't apply.” Prisoners “are kept in tiny dark cells. And in the BIF's six interrogation rooms, Delta Force soldiers routinely drug prisoners, hold a prisoner under water until he thinks he's drowning, or smother them almost to suffocation.” Pentagon officials will deny that prisoners held at the facility are subjected to illegal interrogation tactics. [CNN, 5/21/2004; NBC News, 5/20/2004 Sources: Two unnamed top US government sources]
          

June or July 2003

       Iraqi national Hiwa Abdul Rahman Rashul, later to be nicknamed “Triple-X,” is captured by Kurdish soldiers on suspicion that he is a member of Al-Ansar al-Islam, a militant group operating in northern Iraq. [Washington Post, 10/24/2004] He is then handed over to the CIA, which takes him outside of Iraq to a secret facility in Afghanistan. [New York Times, 9/10/2004]
People and organizations involved: Hiwa Abdul Rahman Rashul
          

June 22, 2003

       In the city of Blantyre in Malawi, the local National Intelligence Bureau, together with US officials, who are reportedly CIA agents, move to arrest five foreigners on suspicion of belonging to al-Qaeda. They are Ibrahim Habaci and Arif Ulusam, both Turkish; Saudi citizen Faha al Bahli; Mahmud Sardar Issa from Sudan; and Kenyan national Khalifa Abdi. They are held incommunicado in an undisclosed location somewhere in Malawi, and defense attorneys take immediate action on their behalf. That evening, the High Court of Blantyre orders that the detainees be brought before it within 48 hours. [Amnesty International, 8/19/2003]
People and organizations involved: Arif Ulusam, Ibrahim Habaci, Faha al Bahli, Mahmud Sardar Issa, Khalifa Abdi
          

July 2003

       By this date, Pakistani authorities have transferred almost 500 individuals to US custody. [Agence France-Presse, 6/18/2003 cited in Human Rights First, 6/2004; The News, 7/17/2003 cited in Human Rights First, 6/2004; Associated Press, 6/19/2003; Human Rights First, 6/2004]
People and organizations involved: Human Rights First
          

July 2003

       Saifullah Paracha, a Pakistani citizen who studied and lived in the US until the mid-1980s, flies from Pakistan to Bangkok on Air Thai. He plans to attend a meeting with his US business partner, Charles Anteby, with whom he runs an import/export company. When the driver sent to pick up Paracha arrives at the airport, he is told Paracha has not left the plane. Paracha has disappeared. More than six weeks later, in August, Paracha's family will receive a letter from the International Red Cross (ICRC), informing them that he is being held at Bagram Air Force Base in Afghanistan. [Human Rights First, 6/2004]
People and organizations involved: Saifullah Paracha, International Committee of the Red Cross
          

March 2004

       Mohammed Saad Iqbal Madni is flown to Bagram air base in Afghanistan and then taken to Guantanamo, where he provides the three Britons known as the Tipton Three with information on Moazzam Begg whom he encountered at Bagram. [Sources: Composite statement by Shafiq Rasul, Asif Iqbal and Rhuhel Ahmed: Detention in Afghanistan and Guantanamo Bay, 7/26/2004] Asif Iqbal, another inmate at Guantanamo, says Madni told him that in Egypt “he had had electrodes put on his knees and something had happened to his bladder.” [Sources: Composite statement by Shafiq Rasul, Asif Iqbal and Rhuhel Ahmed: Detention in Afghanistan and Guantanamo Bay, 7/26/2004]
People and organizations involved: Muhammad Saad Iqbal Madni
          

May 11, 2004

       The Washington Post reports that according to Pentagon figures and estimates by intelligence experts, “more than 9,000 people are held by US authorities overseas ..., the vast majority under military control.” Najeeb Nuaimi, a former justice minister of Qatar, tells the Post: “The number of people who have been detained in the Arab world for the sake of America is much more than in Guantanamo Bay. Really, thousands.” [Washington Post, 5/11/2004]
People and organizations involved: Najeeb Nuaimi
          

May 15, 2004

       The Independent of London reports that “almost 10,000 prisoners [are] held around the world in secretive American-run jails and interrogation centers.” [Independent, 5/15/2004]
          

June 2004

       Lt. Gen. David Barno, head of US forces in Afghanistan, tells the Guardian newspaper of London that there are currently 400 detainees at the Bagram base in Afghanistan, none of whom have been charged. More than 2,000 people have been detained there since the war, he also says. [The Guardian, 6/23/2004]
People and organizations involved: David Barno
          

June 11, 2004

       US News and World Report reports that according to unnamed US and Jordanian intelligence sources, Al Jafr prison, in the southern desert of Jordan, is used as a CIA interrogation center. About 100 detainees have allegedly been processed there, including Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and Abd al-Rahim al Nashiri. “Most stay just a few days before being shipped out to longer-term facilities,” the magazine reports. [US News and World Report, 6/2/2003]
People and organizations involved: Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed
          

June 11, 2004

       Human Rights First interviews the CIA Public Affairs Officer and the Defense Department's Press Office who refuse to confirm or deny the existence of any detention facilities in Jordan controlled by the US. [Human Rights First, 6/2004]
People and organizations involved: Human Rights First
          

June 11, 2004

       A Pentagon official agrees to speak with Human Rights First about Guantanamo and Abu Ghraib, but tells the organization that “as a matter of policy, we don't comment on other facilities.” [Human Rights First, 6/2004]
People and organizations involved: Human Rights First
          

September 17, 2004

       The New York Times reports the existence of a secret CIA detention facility housed in a hotel in the center of Kabul called the “Ariana.” It is off-limits to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the number of detainees held there is unknown. A former Taliban commander, Mullah Rocketi, was reportedly detained there for eight months. He says conditions were reasonably comfortable and he was not mistreated. He was released in 2003 after making an undisclosed deal with his captors. Another Taliban leader detained at the Ariana since January 2004 is Jan Baz Khan, according to an anonymous US military commander. [New York Times, 9/17/2004]
People and organizations involved: Jan Baz Khan, Mullah Rocketi, International Committee of the Red Cross
          


Except where otherwise noted, the textual content of each timeline is licensed under the Creative Commons License below:

Creative Commons License Home |  About this Site |  Development |  Donate |  Contact Us
Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Use