The Center for Cooperative Research
U:     P:    
Not registered yet? Register here
 
Search
 
Current timeline only
Advanced Search


Main Menu
Home 
History Engine Sub-Menu
Timelines 
Entities 
Forum 
Miscellaneous Sub-Menu
Donate 
Links 
End of Main Menu

Volunteers Needed!
Submit a timeline entry
Donate: If you think this site is important, please help us out financially. We need your help!
Email updates
 



  View mode (info):
  Ordering (info):
  Time period (info):

General Topic Areas

Rendition (35)
legalProceedings (41)
Human Rights Groups (45)
Coverup (48)
Impunity (21)
Prisoner deaths (20)
High-level decisions and actions (131)
Indications of Abuse (36)
Statements/writings about torture (8)
Public statements (53)
Detainments (48)
Independent investigations (1)
Reports/Investigations (41)
Suicides (1)
Private contractors (4)
Criticisms of US (41)
Indefinate Detention (3)
Military commissions (32)
Disciplinary actions (15)
Supreme Court Decisions (4)
Media (26)
Aftermath

Types of abuses performed by Americans

Use of dogs (11)
Forced confessions (9)
Mental abuse (7)
Sexual humiliation (34)
Physical assault (73)
Stress positions (22)
Electrodes (3)
Intimidation/threats (22)
Sleep deprivation (23)
Poor conditions (18)
Suppression Religion (7)
Medical services denied (7)
Abrogation of rights (7)
Involuntary drugs (4)
Deception (1)
Isolation (16)
Extreme temperatures (16)
Insufficient food (11)
Dangerous conditions (5)
Ghost detainees (5)
Sexual temptation (2)

Documents

Presidential directives (3)
Internal memos/reports (33)

Specific Events

Qala-i-Janghi massacre (20)

US Bases and Interrogation Centers

Guantanamo (141)
Abu Ghraib (145)
Camp Cropper (10)
Camp Bucca (8)
Camp Rhino (2)
Ariana (1)
Al Jafr (5)
Bagram (40)
Camp Iron Horse (1)
Fire Base Tycze (1)
BIF (1)
LSA Diamondback (1)
Diego Garcia (3)
Asadabad (1)
Kandahar (18)
USS Peleliu (3)
USS Bataan (1)
Sheberghan (1)
Gardez (2)
Far' Falastin (5)
Sednaya (1)
Al Qaim (4)
Palestine Street Base (1)
US Base at Adhamiya (3)
Kabul (2)
Kohat (1)
Jalalabad (1)
Camp Whitehorse (2)
Packhorse (1)

People who have been detained

John Walker Lindh (32)
Maher Arar (11)
Abdullah (1)
Amanullah (1)
Jose Padilla (13)
Yaser Esam Hamdi (21)
Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi (2)
Jamal Udeen (10)
Ali Sale Kayla al-Marri (5)
Mohamed al Chastaini (1)
Tarek Dergoul (11)
Ahmed Agiza (2)
Muhammed Al-Zery (2)
Abdul Razaq (2)
Noor Aghah (1)
Mohammed Saad Iqbal Madni (5)
6 men in Bosnia (4)
Mohammed Saghir (1)
Mohamedou Oulad Slahi (1)
Mamdouh Habib (4)
Jamil Qasim Saeed Mohammed (1)
Mohammed Haydar Zammar (2)
Talaat Fouad Qassem (1)
5 men in Albania (1)
Sayed Abassin (3)
Omar al-Faruq (1)
Mullah Habibullah (2)
Dilawar (4)
Abdul Qayyum (1)
Saif ur-Rahman (1)
Khreisan Khalis Aballey (1)
Abdallah Khudhran al-Shamran (1)
Abd al-Rahman (1)
Najem Sa'doun Hattab (2)
Ibrahim Habaci (3)
Arif Ulusam (3)
Faha al Bahli (3)
Mahmud Sardar Issa (3)
Khalifa Abdi (3)
Saeed Abou Taleb (1)
Sohail Karimi (1)
Adil Al-Jazeeri (1)
Abed Hamed Mowhoush (4)
Saddam Salah al-Rawi (8)
Manadel al-Jamadi (3)
Bisher al-Rawi (4)
Jamil al-Banna (4)
Abdullah El-Janoudi (2)
Zakhim Shah (1)
Wahab al-Rawi (1)
Abdur Rahim (1)
Parkhudin (1)
Wazir Muhammad (2)
Mohammed Ismail Agha (1)
Abdurahman Khadr (2)
Nurjaman Riduan Isamuddin (1)
Moazzam Begg (7)
Martin Mubanga (4)
Hiwa Abdul Rahman Rashul (3)
Abdul Wali (1)
Ala' Jassem Sa'ad (1)
Mohamed al-Khatani (4)
Saifullah Paracha (2)
David Hicks (3)
Feroz Abbasi (3)
Salim Ahmed Hamdan (6)
Ali Hamza Ahmad Sulayman al-Bahlul (2)
Ibrahim Ahmed Mahmoud al-Qosi (2)
Adullah Almalk (1)
Ameen Saeed al-Sheikh (1)
Amjed Isail Waleed (2)
Haj Ali Shallal Abbas (1)
Abd Alwhab Youss (1)
Huda al-Azzawi (10)
Abdou Hussain Saad Faleh (1)
Assad (3)
Nori al-Yasseri (1)
Hussein Mohssein Mata al-Zayiadi (1)
Haidar (1)
Ahmed (1)
Ahzem (1)
Hashiem (1)
Mustafa (1)
Nahla al-Azzawi (4)
Ayad al-Azzawi (3)
Ali al-Azzawi (5)
Mu'taz al-Azzawi (4)
Khalid el-Masri (5)
Mehdi Ghezali (5)
Adil (1)
Abu Abdul Rahman (3)
Mourad Benchellali (1)
Nizar Sassi (2)
Imad Kanouni (1)
Brahim Yadel (1)
Hamed Abderrahman Ahmed (1)
Yasin Qasem Muhammad Ismail (1)
Khalid Abdullah Mishal al-Mutairi (1)
Fawzi Khalid Abdullah Fahad al-Odah (1)
Wael Kishk (1)
Ashraf Ibrahim (1)
A.Z. (1)
Mohammad Naim (1)
Sherbat Naim (1)
Ahmadullah (1)
Amadullah (0)
Muhammad Naim Farooq (1)
Wesam Abdulrahman Ahmed Al Deemawi (1)
Hussein Abdelkadr Youssouf Mustafa (3)
Shafiq Rasul (20)
Rhuhel Ahmed (21)
Asif Iqbal (21)
Khoja Mohammad (1)
Jamaal Belmar (1)
Haji Rohullah Wakil (1)
Abu Zubaida (1)
Alif Khan (2)
Ibrahim Fauzee (1)
Shah Mohammed (1)
Khalid Shaikh Mohammed (2)
Sahim Alwan (3)
Mukhtar al-Bakri (3)
Faysal Galab (3)
Yahya Goba (3)
Yaseinn Taher (3)
Abdul Jabar (1)
Mullah Rocketti (1)
Mohammed Ahmed al-Kandari (1)
Thamir Issawi (0)
Haydar Sabbar Abed (1)
Abd al-Rahim al Nashiri (1)
Jan Baz Khan (1)
Unnamed prisoners (42)
Click here to join: Suggest changes to existing data, add new data to the website, or compile your own timeline. More Info >>

 

Torture, rendition, and other abuses against captives in Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere

 
  

Project: Prisoner abuse in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

Export to XML Printer Friendly View Email to a Friend Increase Text Size Decrease Text Size


May 2004

       Soon after the news about prisoner abuses at Abu Ghraib breaks (see Evening April 28, 2004), the CIA suspends the use of “extraordinary interrogation techniques” at CIA detention facilities around the world, which include feigned drowning, refusal to deliver medications for pain relief to injured captives, “stress positions,” sleep deprivation, sensory deprivation, and making detainees believe they are being interrogated by another government. The decision does not apply to military prisons such as Guantanamo. The decision is made, according to intelligence officials, in anticipation of a review by lawyers from the Justice Department and other parts of the administration. “Everything's on hold,” a former senior CIA official says, “The whole thing has been stopped until we sort out whether we are sure we're on legal ground.” The CIA clearly fears a recurrence of the accusations that took place during the 1970s that the agency was engaged in illegal activities. [Washington Post, 6/27/2004]
          

May 4, 2004

       Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John W. Warner asks Pentagon officials to testify before his committee. The Army's vice chief of staff, Gen. George Casey, briefs the committee behind closed doors. Expressing anger at the fact he was not informed earlier of problems at Abu Ghraib, Democratic Sen. Joseph Biden, says: “Accountability is essential. So the question for me is, what did Secretary Rumsfeld and others in the Pentagon know, when did they know it and what did they do about it?” Biden says in a statement. “If the answers are unsatisfactory, resignations should be sought,” referring to Rumsfeld and others. [CNN, 5/5/2004]
People and organizations involved: Donald Rumsfeld, John W. Warner, George Casey, Joseph Biden
          

May 5-July 7, 2004

       The overseas flights of the Gulfstream V jet, apparently owned by a CIA front organization and used to transfer prisoners to countries for detention and interrogations, are stalled. [The Guardian, 9/13/2004]
          

May 10, 2004

       Thirty-two graves of British and Indian soldiers killed in World War I are desecrated or destroyed at the Commonwealth military cemetery in Palestinian Gaza City. Some graves have posters attached to headstones depicting photos of abuse at Abu Ghraib. “We will revenge” was a message printed on some of the posters. [Associated Press, 5/10/2004]
People and organizations involved: India
          

May 12, 2004

       Senators are shown hundreds of unreleased photographs and videos showing mostly sexual abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib and sex among US soldiers that appears to be consensual. The pictures show forced sodomy; Pfc. Lynndie England having sex with other US soldiers, sometimes in front of prisoners; prisoners cowering in front of attack dogs; Iraqi women being forced to expose their breasts; naked prisoners tied up together; prisoners being forced to masturbate; and a prisoner repeatedly smashing his head against a wall. Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden says afterwards: “I expected that these pictures would be very hard on the stomach lining and it was significantly worse than anything that I had anticipated. ... Take the worse case and multiply it several times over.” [Breaking News (Ireland), 5/13/2004]
People and organizations involved: Lynndie England, Ron Wyden
          

May 14, 2004

       The generals who were most involved in setting interrogation policy in Iraq are invited to hearings by US Congress. Lt. Col. Ricardo S. Sanchez announces he has revoked, as of the previous day, all authorizations for coercive practices, including sensory deprivation, forcing detainees into “stress positions,” and keeping them awake. Although he still makes an exception for very rare circumstances, he says. [The Observer, 5/16/2004]
People and organizations involved: US Congress, Ricardo S. Sanchez
          

May 14, 2004

       Lt. Gen. David Barno, commander of the Combined Forces Command in Afghanistan, reports he is “in the midst of putting out some new policy guidance” and is determined to “make sure those rules are enforced across all our operations in Afghanistan,” and that his subordinates will be “treating all of ... detainees with dignity and respect.” [CNN, 5/18/2004]
People and organizations involved: David Barno
          

May 14, 2004

       An FBI official writes in an e-mail to agent Chris Briese, “According to a Task Force 6-26 e-mail stream I have seen, the following techniques can no longer be used absent the high-level authorization: stress positions, MWDs, sleep management, hoods, stripping (except for health inspection), and environmental manipulation (e.g., loud music).” [Sources: Email to FBI agent Chris Briese, 5/14/2004]
People and organizations involved: Chris Briese
          

May 19, 2004

       The Office of General Counsel (OGC) of the FBI issues an instruction that states that if “an FBI employee knows or suspects non-FBI personnel has abused or is abusing or mistreating a detainee, the FBI employee must report the incident.” [Sources: Email to FBI agent Chris Briese, 5/14/2004]
          

June 4, 2004

       Bertrand Ramcharan, the acting UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, says the mistreatment of Iraqi prisoners could constitute a war crime. He says, “Willful killing, torture, and inhuman treatment” represent a grave breach of international law and “might be designated as war crimes by a competent tribunal.” He also calls for the immediate appointment of “an international ombudsman or commissioner” to oversee the monitoring of human rights in Iraq and to regularly report on compliance with “international norms of human rights and humanitarian law.” [New York Times, 6/5/2004]
People and organizations involved: Bertrand Ramcharan
          

June 21, 2004

       UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan urges the Security Council to vote against a resolution that would exempt US soldiers serving in UN approved operations from prosecution before the International Criminal Court (ICC). Talking to journalists, he says, “For the past two years, I have spoken quite strongly against the exemption, and I think it would be unfortunate for one to press for such an exemption, given the prisoner abuse in Iraq.” [Inter-Press Services, 6/21/2004] He adds, “It would discredit the Council and the United Nations that stands for the rule of law and the primacy of the rule of law.” [Truthout, n.d.] Since President Bush has taken office, the US, by threatening to withdraw funding for UN peacekeeping missions (see July 12, 2002), has made the Security Council adopt a resolution each year prohibiting the ICC from investigating or prosecuting officials from states that have not ratified the Rome Statute, like the US, for acts committed during participation in a UN-authorized mission. “Given the recent revelations from Abu Ghraib prison,” said Richard Dicker from Human Rights Watch, “the US government has picked a hell of a moment to ask for special treatment on war crimes.” [Inter-Press Services, 6/21/2004] The US will eventually withdraw the resolution knowing China will use its veto power. China's ambassador to the UN, Wang Guangya, later explains that his country did not want to support a resolution that could grant impunity to people committing abuses like the ones that happened at Abu Ghraib. [New York Times, 6/5/2004] The “major diplomatic defeat,” as the Financial Times calls it, “also marked,” according to the Washington Post, “the most concrete evidence of a diplomatic backlash against the scandal over abuses of US detainees in Afghanistan and Iraq.” [Truthout, n.d.] However, even with the defeat at the Security Council there is little chance that the US will be brought before the court for any future alleged war crimes because of bilateral immunity agreements that are still in force between the US and several countries (see August 2002-July 1, 2003). [Inter-Press Services, 6/21/2004]
People and organizations involved: United Nations, Richard Dicker, George W. Bush, Kofi Annan, Wang Guangya
          

June 22, 2004

       To demonstrate that President Bush has never authorized torture against prisoners, the White House declassifies and releases a large number of internal documents, including the February 7, 2002 memo (see February 7, 2002) signed by Bush, and documents, inter alia from Gen. James T. Hill, showing that the US military interrogators were seeking more aggressive interrogation techniques. The disclosures are made, according to Alberto R. Gonzales, because the government “felt that it was harmful to this country, in terms of the notion that perhaps we may be engaging in torture.” [Washington Post, 6/23/2004]
People and organizations involved: Alberto R. Gonzales, James T. Hill, George W. Bush, Bush administration
          

June 22, 2004

       Aides to President Bush, including Alberto Gonzales, publicly renounce the internal memo of August 1, 2002 (see August 1, 2002) that outlined a legal opinion by the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel (OLC). They say it created the false impression that the US government was claiming the right to authorize interrogation techniques in violation of international law. Gonzales agrees that some of its conclusions were “controversial” and “subject to misinterpretation.” [Washington Post, 6/23/2004] The White House announces that all legal advice rendered by the OLC on interrogations will be reviewed and that sections of the August memo will be rewritten. Gonzales says the section in the memo arguing that the president, as Commander-in-Chief, is not bound by anti-torture laws is “unnecessary.” Justice Department officials also say the section will be scrapped. [Washington Post, 6/27/2004] In his introductory statement, however, Gonzales describes the circumstances under which the memo had come about: “We face an enemy that lies in the shadows, an enemy that doesn't sign treaties, they don't wear uniforms, an enemy that owes no allegiance to any country, they do not cherish life. An enemy that doesn't fight, attack, or plan according to accepted laws of war, in particular Geneva Conventions.” [White House, 6/22/2004] Gonzales claims that giving these people a protected status under the Geneva Conventions would be tantamount to rewarding the terrorists' lawlessness. “[T]o protect terrorists when they ignore the law is to give incentive to continued ignoring that law,” he says. [White House, 6/22/2004] Gonzales says he thinks that Bush never actually saw the August 2002 memo: “I don't believe the president had access to any legal opinions from the Department of Justice.” [New York Times, 6/24/2004]
People and organizations involved: Alberto R. Gonzales, George W. Bush
          

July 9, 2004

       In an e-mail announcing a “special inquiry,” Steve McCraw, the assistant director of the FBI's Office for Intelligence, asks more than 500 FBI agents who have been stationed at Guantanamo to report whether they have observed “aggressive treatment, interrogations, or interview techniques” that violate FBI guidelines. Twenty-six of the 478 responding agents report having witnessed mistreatment by personnel of other US agencies. FBI general counsel Valerie Caproni later determines 17 of these 26 pertain to “approved DOD techniques.” The others are marked for further investigation. [American Civil Liberties Union, 1/5/2005]
People and organizations involved: American Civil Liberties Union
          


Except where otherwise noted, the textual content of each timeline is licensed under the Creative Commons License below:

Creative Commons License Home |  About this Site |  Development |  Donate |  Contact Us
Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Use