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General Topic Areas

Indoor remediation (34)
Misuse of EPA standards (17)
EPA's reponse (21)
Personal stories (3)
Government statements (34)
Expert opinions/Independent studies (36)
Rescue/recovery workers (18)
Government tests (33)
Deception (22)
Documented cases WTC-related illness

Specific Issues and Cases

The Transfer of the EPA Ombudsman (22)
Asbestos removal in Libby, Montana (7)
USGS assessment (9)
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Environmental Impact of 9/11

 
  

Project: Environmental impact of 911 attacks

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Mid-October, 2001

       Rich Regis, a Wall Street Journal editor, undergoes treatment for “kidney failure, a perforated colon and sepsis, a generalized infection of the body.” His doctors say that his ailments may have been caused by something he “inhaled or ingested” when he was caught in the debris storm caused by the collapse of the WTC. [NY Daily News, 10/25/01]
People and organizations involved: Rich Regis
          

June 1, 2002

       An article in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine summarizes the condition of a New York City firefighter who has contracted acute eosinophilic pneumonia, a rare disease caused by acute high dust exposure. Tests indicate that the firefighter—who worked 16-hour days for 2 weeks at the World Trade Center site—had fly ash, degraded glass, as well as chrysotile and amosite asbestos fibers in his lungs. [American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2002]
          

January 2003

       The journal, Chest, publishes an article summarizing the case of a 37-year-old male engineer who is diagnosed with cough and dyspnea three weeks after being exposed to dust at Ground Zero. The patient's lung biopsy contained large quantities of silicates. The authors of the study suggest “that exposure to one or more materials resulting from the WTC catastrophe may be implicated in the development of granulomatous pulmonary disease.” [Safirstein B.H., et al. 1/2003]
          

April 2004

       The Manhattan Supreme Court orders the City of New York to pay New York City Officer Richard Lahm a tax-free disability pension, ruling that environmental conditions at Ground Zero exacerbated his tonsil cancer. Earlier in the year, Lahm retired from the 46th Precinct in the Bronx after his terminal tonsil cancer worsened. His doctors argued that toxins released at the WTC actually caused his condition. [New York Daily News, 6/24/04]
People and organizations involved: Richard Lahm
          


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