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Profile: Porter J. Goss

 
  

Positions that Porter J. Goss has held:

  • Republican House Representative, served on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence


 

Quotes

 
  

Quote, September 25, 2003

   Evidence that was provided by the CIA often consisted of “piecemeal” intelligence. “Intelligence assessments that Iraq continued to pursue chemical and biological weapons ... were long-standing judgments,” which “remained constant and static over the past ten years,” they complain in the letter [Reuters, 9/29/03, Washington Post, 9/28/03]

Associated Events


 

Relations

 
  

No related entities for this entity.


 

Porter J. Goss actively participated in the following events:

 
  

December 11, 2001      Complete Iraq timeline

       The House International Relations Committee drafts House Joint Resolution 75 which states that if Iraq refuses to allow UN inspectors to investigate freely in Iraq, the refusal will constitute an “act of aggression against the United States.” The bill is sponsored by Representatives Lindsey Graham, Porter Goss and Henry Hyde. A different version of this resolution is passed by the House on December 20 (see December 20, 2001). [World Net Daily, 12/11/01; H.J Res 75]
People and organizations involved: Henry Hyde, Porter J. Goss, Lindsey Graham
          

December 20, 2001      Complete Iraq timeline

       House Joint Resolution 75 is passed by the House and sent to the Senate where it is referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations. It is not as strongly worded as the initial draft (see December 11, 2001), which had included a provision stating that the refusal to admit inspectors would constitute an “act of aggression against the United States.” The final version instead reads: “Iraq's refusal to allow United Nations weapons inspectors immediate, unconditional, and unrestricted access to facilities and documents covered by United Nations Security Council Resolution 687 and other relevant resolutions presents a mounting threat to the United States, its friends and allies, and international peace and security.” The bill is sponsored by Representatives Lindsey Graham, Porter Goss and Henry Hyde. [H.J Res 75] This bill will die in the Senate. The congressional bill that conditionally authorizes Bush to take military action against Iraq is not passed until October 11, 2002 (see October 8 and 11, 2002).
People and organizations involved: Henry Hyde, Porter J. Goss, Lindsey Graham
          

September 25, 2003      Complete Iraq timeline

       Top Republican legislators Porter J. Goss and Jane Harman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence send a letter to CIA Director George J. Tenet, criticizing his agency for providing poor intelligence on Iraq during the months leading up to the invasion of Iraq. They were prompted to write the letter after spending “four months combing through 19 volumes of classified material” and discovering how poorly the evidence supported the White House's assertions about Iraq. Administration officials downplay the charges. In the letter, they say the CIA provided intelligence based on “circumstantial,” “fragmentary,” and ambiguous evidence. “Thus far, it appears that these judgments were based on too many uncertainties,” they note in their letter. [Washington Post, 9/28/03; Reuters, 9/29/03] They also accuse the CIA of using intelligence that was outdated, including assessments dating back to 1998 when the UN was forced to leave Iraq ahead of US bombing. Evidence that was recent often consisted of “piecemeal” intelligence. “Intelligence assessments that Iraq continued to pursue chemical and biological weapons ... were long-standing judgments,” which “remained constant and static over the past ten years,” they complain in the letter. [Reuters, 9/29/03; Washington Post, 9/28/03] Another criticism they have is that the intelligence agency sometimes drew conclusions based on faulty logic. “The absence of proof that chemical and biological weapons and their related development programs had been destroyed was considered proof that they continued to exist,” they say. [Washington Post, 9/28/03; Reuters, 9/29/03] Lastly, they complain that the CIA uncritically accepted claims from dubious sources. In the agency's assessments, it failed to clarify which reports “were from sources that were credible and which were from sources that would otherwise be dismissed in the absence of any other corroborating intelligence.” [Washington Post, 9/28/03] Significantly, the authors assert, “We have not found any information in the assessments that are still classified that was any more definitive.” [Washington Post, 9/27/03] The White House dismisses the two Republicans' criticisms.
People and organizations involved: Porter J. Goss, Jane Harman, George Tenet  Additional Info 
          

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