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Profile: Guy Philippe

 
  

Positions that Guy Philippe has held:

  • Police Chief in Cap-Haitien, Haiti


 

Quotes

 
  

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Guy Philippe actively participated in the following events:

 
  

Early 1990s      Haiti Coup

       Haitian Guy Philippe is trained by US Special Forces in Ecuador. [Human Rights Watch, 2/27/04; Miami Herald, 2/28/04; Observer, 3/2/2004; One World, 3/2/2004]
People and organizations involved: Guy Philippe
          

1995      Haiti Coup

       Guy Philippe joins the new Haitian National Police and is posted at Ouanamithe near Haiti's northern border with the Dominican Republic. [Human Rights Watch, 2/27/04; Miami Herald, 2/28/04]
People and organizations involved: Guy Philippe
          

1997-1999      Haiti Coup

       Guy Philippe serves as police chief in the Port-au-Prince suburb of Delmas. According to Human Rights Watch, “dozens of suspected gang members ... [are] summarily executed, mainly by police under the command of Inspector Berthony Bazile, Philippe's deputy.” Philippe will later deny the allegation in an interview with the Miami Herald. [Human Rights Watch, 2/27/04; Miami Herald, 2/28/04]
People and organizations involved: Berthony Bazile, Guy Philippe
          

October 18, 2000      Haiti Coup

       The prime minister of Haiti says that Guy Philippe and others are planning to overthrow the Aristide government. Philippe and the other plotters flee across the Dominican border before they can be arrested. [Human Rights Watch, 2/27/04; Miami Herald, 2/28/04]
People and organizations involved: Guy Philippe, Jean-Bertrand Aristide
          

(2001-2004)      Haiti, Haiti Coup

       The United States Government funds and trains a 600-member paramilitary army of anti-Aristide Haitians in the Dominican Republic with the authorization of the country's president, Hipolito Mejia. The funds—totaling $1.2 milllion—are directed through the International Republican Institute (IRI) on the pretext of encouraging democracy in Haiti. In order to evade attention, the paramilitary soldiers appear at their training sessions dressed in the uniforms of the Dominican Republic national police. The training—provided by some 200 members of the US Special Forces—takes place in the Dominican villages of Neiba, San Cristobal, San Isidro, Hatillo and Haina, and others. Most of the training takes place on property owned by the Dominican Republic Government. Technical training, conducted once a month, takes place in a Santo Domingo hotel through the IRI. Among the Hatians that take part in the program are known human rights violators including Guy Philippe and Louis-Jodel Chamblain. [Democracy Now!, 4/7/2004; Radio Mundo, 4/2/2004; Xinhuanet, 3/29/2004; Newsday, 3/16/2004]
People and organizations involved: Louis-Jodel Chamblain, Guy Philippe, International Republican Institute (IRI)
          

February 2003      Haiti Coup

       Stanley Lucas, who is the point man in Haiti for the Republican-dominated International Republican Institute (IRI) based in the Dominican Republic, meets with Haitian rebel Guy Philippe and his men. Three months later the group will cross into Haiti and attack a hydroelectric power plant. Lucas has long ties to the Haitian military (see Early May 2003). After the toppling of Aristide's government 12 months later, it will be learned that the group had been funded and trained through the IRI (see (2001-2004)). [The Black Commentator, 5/15/2003; Interhemispheric Resource Center (IRC), 2/27/2004]
People and organizations involved: International Republican Institute (IRI), Stanley Lucas, Guy Philippe
          

Early May 2003      Haiti Coup

       A group of at least 20 paramilitary soldiers—trained and funded by the US (see (2001-2004)) —cross into Haiti from the neighboring Dominican Republic and attack a hydroelectric power plant on Haiti's central plateau. Shortly after the attack, Dominican authorities, at the behest of the Haitian government, arrest five men, including Guy Philippe, in connection with the paramilitary operation. But they are quickly released by the Dominicans who say there is no evidence of their involvement in the attack. Philippe is interviewed by the Associated Press afterwards and asked what he is doing in the Dominican. Philippe, who mentions to the reporter that he would support a coup against Aristide, refuses to “say how he makes a living or what he does to spend his time in the Dominican Republic.” Less than one year later, Philippe will participate in the overthrow of the Aristide government. [The Black Commentator, 5/15/2003] On the same day the five men are detained, Haitian authorities raid the Port-au-Prince residence of mayoral candidate Judith Roy of the Democratic Convergence opposition. The Haitians claim to find “assault weapons, ammunitions, and plans to attack the National Palace and Aristide's suburban residence.” The Haitian government contends that Roy is close to Philippe. [The Black Commentator, 5/15/2003]
People and organizations involved: Guy Philippe, Democratic Convergence, Judith Roy
          

(March 15, 2004)      Haiti Coup

       Guy Philippe orders 30-year-old anti-Aristide paramilitary leader, “Ti Gary,” to “go into the La Savanne neighborhood and kill Lavalas supporters.” When Ti Gary refuses, Philippe's deputy shoots him with a shotgun in the leg. [National Lawyers Guild, 4/11/2004 Sources: Ti Gary]
People and organizations involved: Ti Gary, Guy Philippe
          

April 29, 2004      Haiti Coup

       In an interview with the Miami Herald, Haitian rebel Guy Philippe says that his paramilitary group, the Front de Resistance, would soon be laying down its arms and founding a new political party, the Front de Reconstrucion Nationale. He adds that he will consider running as the party's candidate for president. “We have to do a poll and see who has the advantage,” he explains. “If the poll says I am the person, I will be the person.” If elected president, Philippe says his first priority would be reestablishing the Haitian national army. “This would be a professional army, not the one we had,” he says, reasoning that “[y]ou can't have foreigners invest without security.” Next on his agenda, Philippe continues, would be “education, education, education.” And unlike Aristide, whose policies often conflicted with the interests of Haiti's wealthy elite— “who have maintained a stark class system in Haiti for 200 years” —Philippe's policies would avoid antagonizing them. “They have a key role in this country,” he explains. Philippe claims that he and other rebels, whom human rights groups have demanded be excluded from politics in post-Aristide Haiti (see March 3, 2004), are being misrepresented. For example, he contends that Louis-Jodel Chamblain, who was convicted in absentia for his involvement in the Raboteau Massacre (see April 18-22, 1994), is in fact a hero. “I'm sorry, but Chamblain is a hero. A lot of people love him here. He offered his life for his countrymen.” An unnamed US official tells the Miami Herald, “It's a very scary thought. It's all the same guys. Talk about taking one step forward and two steps back.” [Miami Herald, 4/30/2004]
People and organizations involved: Louis-Jodel Chamblain, Guy Philippe
          

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