The Center for Cooperative Research
U:     P:    
Not registered yet? Register here
 
Search
 
Advanced Search


Main Menu
Home 
History Engine Sub-Menu
Timelines 
Entities 
Forum 
Miscellaneous Sub-Menu
Donate 
Links 
End of Main Menu

Volunteers Needed!
Submit a timeline entry
Donate: If you think this site is important, please help us out financially. We need your help!
Email updates
 


Click here to join: Suggest changes to existing data, add new data to the website, or compile your own timeline. More Info >>

 

Profile: Richard A. Boucher

 
  

Positions that Richard A. Boucher has held:

  • Spokesperson for the State Department


 

Quotes

 
  

Quote, January 11, 2003

   “I can certainly say that they're getting the best [intelligence] we've got, and that we are sharing information with the inspectors that they can use, and based on their ability to use it.” [The Washington Post 1/12/03]

Associated Events

Quote, January 15, 2003

   “There's no point in continuing forever, going on, if Iraq is not cooperating.” [Associated Press, 1/15/03]

Associated Events


 

Relations

 
  

No related entities for this entity.


 

Richard A. Boucher actively participated in the following events:

 
  

October 21, 2002      Complete Iraq timeline

       US Ambassador to the UN John Negroponte provides the five permanent members of the UN Security Council with a revision of the UN draft resolution. [Associated Press, 10/21/02; Telegraph, 10/22/02 Sources: Revised Draft of a US-British UN Resolution on Iraq] The Bush administration makes it clear that it expects the UN Security Council to vote on this draft of the resolution soon and signals that US officials are losing their patience with other member states. At the daily White House press briefing, Secretary Ari Fleischer says, “It's coming down to the end. The United Nations does not have forever.” Similarly, State Department Spokesman Richard Boucher, states, “We're also making clear it is time to wrap this up.” [Associated Press, 10/21/02; Associated Press, 10/21/02b] George Bush will say the following day: “The UN can't make its mind up. If Saddam won't disarm, we will lead a coalition to disarm him for the sake of peace. [The United Nations] must resolve itself to be something more than the League of Nations, must resolve itself to be more than a debating society, must resolve itself to keep international peace.” Summing up US feelings, an unnamed official tells the New York Times that the administration's message to the other permanent members is, “You're either with us or against us.” [Telegraph, 10/22/02; New York Times, 10/23/02; CNN, 10/22/02]
The revision drops the words “all necessary means,” stipulating in its place that Iraq's failure to abide by the new resolution would result in “serious consequences.” [Associated Press, 10/21/02; Associated Press, 10/21/02b; Telegraph, 10/22/02; Washington Post, 10/22/02 Sources: Revised Draft of a US-British UN Resolution on Iraq]
The revision does not require that UN inspectors be accompanied by armed guards, a requirement in the earlier draft which many current and former UN inspectors opposed. [Associated Press, 10/21/02; Associated Press, 10/21/02b Sources: Revised Draft of a US-British UN Resolution on Iraq]
A provision in the previous draft requiring that member states help the UN enforce “no-fly” and “no-drive” zones around the inspection sites remains in the draft resolution, but in brackets, suggesting that the US and Britain are willing to negotiate on this point. [Associated Press, 10/21/02b; Telegraph, 10/22/02; Economist, 10/23/02 Sources: Revised Draft of a US-British UN Resolution on Iraq]
The revision does not require that the five permanent members of the Security Council be permitted to appoint their own officials to the inspection teams. [Telegraph, 10/22/02; Associated Press, 10/21/02b Sources: Revised Draft of a US-British UN Resolution on Iraq]
The revision stipulates that Iraq must declare its weapons of mass destruction within 30 days of the resolution's passing, after which the weapons inspectors would have another 45 days to commence its work on disarmament. If Iraq does not meet the deadline, its failure to do so will be considered a “material breach” of the resolution. [Economist, 10/23/02; ABC News, 10/23/02 Sources: John Negroponte]
The revised draft still contains phrases that set a hair trigger for the implementation of “serious consequences.” The revision stipulates that further “false statements and omissions” by Iraq would amount to “a further material breach.” [Economist, 10/23/02 Sources: Revised Draft of a US-British UN Resolution on Iraq]
Reactions - In spite of the revision, the oppositional stances of France, Russia, Mexico, and China remain unchanged. Bulgaria, Colombia, Norway, Singapore show some support for the revision. [Telegraph, 10/22/02; Associated Press, 10/21/02b; Times, 10/28/02]
People and organizations involved: Richard A. Boucher, George W. Bush, Ari Fleischer, Revised Draft of a US-British UN Resolution on Iraq  Additional Info 
          

January 11, 2003      Complete Iraq timeline

       Following press reports that the Bush administration has begun supplying inspectors with intelligence, director-general of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Mohamed ElBaradei tells reporters that the inspection teams need “more actionable information” and that the US is still refusing to provide “specific intelligence about where to go and where to inspect.” He adds that “the inspections process will intensify to allow the inspections to speedup” if the Bush administration cooperates with inspectors. He also suggests that he does not think Iraq has a nuclear weapons program. He says: “I think it's difficult for Iraq to hide a complete nuclear-weapons program. They might be hiding some computer studies or R. and D. on one single centrifuge. These are not enough to make weapons.” [Time, 1/12/03; Montreal Gazette, 1/11/03; Sun-Herald, 1/12/03; The Washington Post, 1/12/03] Richard A. Boucher, a spokesperson for the State Department, contests ElBaradei's contention that inspectors have been given little to go on, saying, “I can certainly say that they're getting the best we've got, and that we are sharing information with the inspectors that they can use, and based on their ability to use it.” [The Washington Post, 1/12/03]
People and organizations involved: Richard A. Boucher, Mohamed ElBaradei  Additional Info 
          

January 16, 2003      Complete Iraq timeline

       State Department spokesman Richard Boucher warns that Washington will not wait for the inspections to end before taking military action. Boucher states, “There's no point in continuing forever, going on, if Iraq is not cooperating.” [Associated Press, 1/16/03; Telegraph, 1/19/03]
People and organizations involved: Richard A. Boucher
          

February 11, 2003      Complete Iraq timeline

       The Arab satellite TV channel Al Jazeera broadcasts a tape of a voice alleged to be that of Osama Bin Laden. The 16-minute long tape is in Arabic and calls on the Iraqi people to resist US aggression. It also encourages suicide attacks. [BBC, 2/12/03; Associated Press, 2/12/03; New York Times, 2/12/03; Reuters, 2/11/03; CNN, 2/11/03; AP, 2/11/03; Washington Post, 11/12/03; AP, 2/11/03b] Bush administration officials attempt to capitalize on the tape's discovery claiming that it represents solid evidence of ties between Osama Bin Laden and Saddam Hussein. US Secretary of State Colin Powell refers to the purported link as a “partnership.” And Powell's spokesperson, Richard Boucher says that the recording proves “that bin Laden and Saddam Hussein seem to find common ground.” [New York Times, 2/12/03; Reuters, 2/11/03; Washington Post, 11/12/03] But a senior editor for Al-Jazeera says the tape offers no evidence of ties between al-Qaeda and Saddam Hussein. “When you hear it, it doesn't prove any relation between bin Laden or Al Qaeda group and the Iraqi regime,” he argues. [ABC News, 2/12/03] Several news reports also challenge Powell and Boucher's interpretation. For example, CNN reveals that the voice had criticized Saddam's regime, declaring that “the socialists and the rulers [had] lost their legitimacy a long time ago, and the socialists are infidels regardless of where they are, whether in Baghdad or in Aden.” [CNN, 2/11/03; New York Times, 11/12/03b] Similarly, a report published by Reuters notes that the voice “did not express support for Iraqi President Saddam Hussein—it said Muslims should support the Iraqi people rather than the country's government.” [Reuters, 2/11/03] And in a story posted—but later pulled—by MSNBC, it is actually reported that the voice “called on Iraqis to rise up and oust Iraq President Saddam Hussein.” [MSNBC, 2/11/03] MSNBC later says it pulled the story because the statement was presumably based on an unconfirmed translation. An editor for anti-war.com challenged these claims. [Anti-war.com, 2/11/03]
People and organizations involved: Richard A. Boucher, Colin Powell, Saddam Hussein, Osama bin Laden
          

Except where otherwise noted, the textual content of each timeline is licensed under the Creative Commons License below:

Creative Commons License Home |  About this Site |  Development |  Donate |  Contact Us
Terms of Use