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Profile: New York Environmental Law and Justice Project

 
  

Positions that New York Environmental Law and Justice Project has held:



 

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New York Environmental Law and Justice Project actively participated in the following events:

 
  

(September 18, 2001-September 21, 2001)      911 Environmental Impact

       Attorney Joel R Kupferman of the New York Environmental Law and Justice Project speaks with several emergency workers, police officers, firefighters, union representatives, office workers and residents. According to Kupferman, “All [express] serious concerns about the health hazards they now face firsthand. Some are having trouble breathing, some wheezing and coughing. Many are suffering with severe eye irritation and headaches.” [New York Environmental Law and Justice Project, 9/22/2001]
People and organizations involved: New York Environmental Law and Justice Project, Joel R Kupferman
          

(September 19, 2001      911 Environmental Impact

       ATC Associates of New York analyzes bulk dust samples taken from Vesey and Liberty Streets near the WTC site by Monona Rossol, an industrial hygienist with the Arts, Crafts, and Theater Safety organization, and Attorney Joel R Kupferman of the New York Environmental Law and Justice Project. The first four samples tested are found to contain 10-15 percent fiberglass, an extremely high concentration. A quarter of the samples have an asbestos level of 2.1 percent. [Newsday, 10/12/01; New York Environmental Law & Justice Project, 9/19/2001; Village Voice, 9/26/2001; New York Environmental Law & Justice Project, 9/22/2001] Shortly after these results are made public, the New York State Department of Health warns local labs that they will lose their licenses if they process any more “independent sampling.” [Kupferman, 2003 Sources: Unnamed Lab Technician who received one such warning]
People and organizations involved: US Health and Human Services (HSS), Arts, Crafts and Theater Safety organization (ACTS), ATC Associates, New York Environmental Law and Justice Project, Joel R Kupferman
          

September 22, 2001      911 Environmental Impact

       Monona Rossol, an industrial hygienist with Arts, Crafts, and Theater Safety, writes a press release criticizing the New York City Department of Health (DOH)'s WTC disaster cleanup guidelines (see September 17, 2001). The press release, co-signed by the New York Environmental Law and Justice Project, points out that the DOH's guidelines could “cause people to take needless risks.” Rossol takes issue with a September 20 New York Times article which suggested that residents could adequately clean up their apartments with a $3 mask and a broom, noting that “[t]aking actions like these can damage health and may even shorten lives in the future.” She insists “methods chosen to clean homes and offices must depend on analysis of the dust and the amounts present.” [Kupferman, 9/22/2001]
People and organizations involved: Monona Rossol, New York City Department of Health, New York Environmental Law and Justice Project
          

October 11, 2001      911 Environmental Impact

       Hundreds of residents and workers in Lower Manhattan attend a public meeting at Pace University where a panel of experts discusses the potential health risks associated with post-WTC collapse air contamination. Though they provide reassurances on the issue of asbestos levels, they highlight the uncertainty over the potential impact of other contaminants. “We don't know all the facts,” Stephen Levin MD, a panelist, notes. “We do know that the further you are from the site, the less risk you have. No one at this point can give you absolute reassurance that there is no risk.” The New York Environmental Law and Justice Project is present at the meeting and distributes an informational flier citing evidence from an independent analysis of dust samples finding that fiberglass composes 15% by weight of the bulk sample (see (September 19, 2001). The flyer also warns of the effects of WTC fires spewing highly toxic combustion products, including dioxins, PCBs, furans and other cancer-causing substances. [Newsday, 10/12/2001]
People and organizations involved: New York Environmental Law and Justice Project, Stephen Levin MD
          

October 19, 2001      911 Environmental Impact

       The New York Environmental Law and Justice Project obtains internal EPA documents containing data that the agency did not include in the monitoring results it posted on its website on October 3 (see (October 3, 2001)). The documents, which include hundreds of pages of daily monitoring reports, reveal that “[d]ioxins, PCBs, benzene, lead and chromium are among the toxic substances detected in the air and soil around the WTC site by Environmental Protection Agency [monitoring] equipment—sometimes at levels far exceeding federal levels.” For example, one test indicated water being discharged into the Hudson River contained chromium, copper, lead and zinc at levels “elevated to several orders of magnitude above ambient water-quality criteria for most metals.” Also included is disturbing data about the air quality. “On numerous days, sulfur dioxide readings in the air at a half-dozen sites in Lower Manhattan have been far higher than the EPA's ambient air quality standards,” one document reveals. [New York Daily News, 10/21/2001; Thomas Crosbie Media, 10/26/2001; Associated Press, 10/27/2001; Kupferman, 2003]
People and organizations involved: New York Environmental Law and Justice Project, Environmental Protection Agency
          

November 13, 2001      911 Environmental Impact

       The New York Environmental Law and Justice Project (NYELJP) receives documents from New York's Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the city's Department of Health (DOH) that had been requested through the state's Freedom of Information Law (FOIL). The request was initially denied on grounds that the documents were related to an “on-going criminal investigation.” NYELJP receives them only after an appeal and repeated demands. The documents reveal that during spot testing the DEC's monitors became clogged with dust and were not subsequently replaced or re-set as they should have been. The documents also contain NYC DOH test results showing that some of the air monitors located in City Hall offices and other spaces in downtown Manhattan had at times been “overloaded” with dust. Instead of recalibrating the equipment and re-testing, the department simply ceased testing. Rather than inform the public about the overload dust finding, the agency listed the results as “N.A.” on its website. [Kupferman, 2003]
People and organizations involved: New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), New York Environmental Law and Justice Project, New York City Department of Health
          

April 15, 2002-April 18, 2002      911 Environmental Impact

       Joel Kupferman of the New York Environmental Law and Justice Project collects dust samples at 150 Franklin Street at the request of the building's tenants. He sends three samples to a lab which tests the dust for asbestos using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The lab finds asbestos levels of 1.2, 1.4 and 1.8 percent. In September (see Shortly after September 17, 2001), the tenants had cleaned the building according to instructions provided by the city's health department (see September 17, 2001). The building's tenants—among them a family-run child care center—had relied on assurances from EPA and city officials that the downtown air was safe and consequently did not have the building professionally tested. After Kupferman notifies the city about these alarming results, the city tests the building using polarized light microscopy (PLM) on April 18 and does not find elevated asbestos levels. The city's samples are retested by the EPA using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and found to have an asbestos level ranging from 2 percent to 5 percent. “We recommended that [the building] be professionally cleaned,” EPA spokesperson Mary Mears later says. [Salon, 4/15/2003; New York Daily News, 5/2/2002; The Wall Street Journal, 5/9/2002]
People and organizations involved: Environmental Protection Agency, Joel R Kupferman, New York Environmental Law and Justice Project
          

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