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Profile: Antonio M. Taguba

 
  

Positions that Antonio M. Taguba has held:

  • Major General, US Army


 

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Antonio M. Taguba actively participated in the following events:

 
  

August 20, 2003      Torture in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

       Brig. Gen. Janis L. Karpinski sends a General Officer Memorandum of Reprimands (GOMOR) to everybody in the chain of command for failure to properly train a soldier of the 400th MP Battalion, whose M-16 accidentally shot a hole in the fuel tank of a vehicle as he was exiting it. This memorandum includes a long list of reprimanded staff. Major General Antonio M. Taguba will later include the list in his report on the 800th MP Brigade to support his argument that “numerous officers and senior NCOs have been reprimanded/disciplined for misconduct.” [Sources: Article 15-6 Investigation of the 800th Military Police Brigade]
People and organizations involved: Antonio M. Taguba, Janis L. Karpinski
          

Late 2003      Torture in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

       At Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad, MPs hide prisoners from a Red Cross delegation by shifting them around the complex. These prisoners, or “ghost detainees,” are a group of detainees that have been imprisoned without names, charges, or other documentation. According to Maj. Gen. Antonio M. Taguba's February 26 report (see February 26, 2004), a number of jails operated by the 800th Military Police Brigade “routinely held” such prisoners “without accounting for them, knowing their identities, or even the reason for their detention.” Taguba will note that the practice is a “violation of international law.” [Los Angeles Times, 5/5/2004; Washington Post, 5/8/2004; Washington Post, 5/11/2004 Sources: Article 15-6 Investigation of the 800th Military Police Brigade]
People and organizations involved: Antonio M. Taguba  Additional Info 
          

January 19, 2004      Torture in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

       Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez orders a high level administrative investigation into the 800th Military Police Brigade apart from the criminal investigation that was announced three days earlier (see January 16, 2004). He appoints Major General Antonio M. Taguba to conduct the inquiry and limits the scope of the investigation to the conduct of the military police brigade. Taguba's report will be filed on February 26 (see February 26, 2004). [New York Times, 5/10/2004; Sydney Morning Herald, 5/4/2004 Sources: Article 15-6 Investigation of the 800th Military Police Brigade] As preparations for investigation are underway, investigators reportedly give the MPs at Abu Ghraib “a week's notice before inspecting their possessions.” [Sources: Several unnamed soldiers] Whether it is an attempt to sabotage the investigation, or a matter of clumsiness on the part of the military leadership or the CID, the result may well be that evidence of abuse is deliberately destroyed. “That shows you how lax they are about discipline. ‘We are going to look for contraband in here, so hint, hint, get rid of the stuff,’ that's the way things work in the Guard,” MP Ramone Leal will say. [Reuters, 5/6/2004]
People and organizations involved: Antonio M. Taguba, Ramone Leal, Ricardo S. Sanchez
          

January 31, 2004      Torture in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

       The investigation of the Abu Ghraib abuse case is taken up by Maj. Gen. Antonio M. Taguba. Taguba is the deputy commanding general of the Third Army and of the CFLCC in Kuwait, a post he was assigned in July 2003. [New York Times, 5/11/2004] He is administratively a direct superior of Karpinski.
People and organizations involved: Antonio M. Taguba
          

February 12, 2004      Torture in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

       Col. Thomas M. Pappas, commander of the 205th Military Intelligence Brigade, is interviewed by Maj. Gen. Antonio M. Taguba and admits that intelligence officers have instructed the military police at Abu Ghraib to shackle and strip naked detainees prior to interrogation. He also says that the Military Intelligence Brigade has no formal mechanisms in place to prevent abuses. [New York Times, 5/18/2004]
People and organizations involved: Thomas M. Pappas, Antonio M. Taguba
          

March 3, 2004      Torture in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

       Maj. Gen. Antonio M. Taguba out-briefs the findings of his investigation to Gen. David McKiernan. [New York Times, 5/10/2004; Slate, 5/5/2004]
People and organizations involved: Peter Pace, Donald Rumsfeld, David D. McKiernan, Antonio M. Taguba
          

March 9, 2004      Torture in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

       Maj. Gen. Antonio M. Taguba submits the final version of his report (see February 26, 2004) on the investigation into prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib by MPs. He concludes that military intelligence personnel played a part in the abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib. But due to the fact that his investigation was limited to the conduct of MPs (see January 19, 2004), he did not investigate military intelligence conduct. Another investigation (see August 25, 2004), however, is launched that will examine military intelligence's role in the abuses. It will be conducted by Maj. Gen. George R. Fay, the Army's deputy chief of staff for intelligence. But the scope of this investigation is also limited from the outset, for two reasons. First, as a two-star general, he cannot hold any officer of his own rank or higher accountable. Second, Fay is appointed by Lt. Col. Ricardo S. Sanchez and therfore the scope of investigation is limited to the people under Sanchez's command. [Newsweek, 6/7/2004] Additionally, Fay may be less inclined to report negatively on military intelligence personnel, since his superior, Lt. Gen. Keith Alexander, head of Army Intelligence, has already stated that the abuse at Abu Ghraib was committed by “a group of undisciplined military police” who were acting on their own, and not upon instructions from military intelligence officers. [Truthout, no date]
People and organizations involved: George R. Fay, Ricardo S. Sanchez, Antonio M. Taguba, Keith Alexander
          

March 12, 2004      Torture in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

       Maj. Gen. Antonio M. Taguba presents his report (see February 26, 2004) on prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib to his commanders. [Truthout, no date] The report is “very closely held” among the Army's senior leadership and the report is only accessible to top officials on a secure computer network. Congress is not informed of the report or its findings. [Baltimore Sun, 5/6/2004] It is classified as “Secret / No Foreign Dissemination.” Neither the vice-chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Marine Gen. Peter Pace, nor the Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld will later say they know why the report was classified when asked at a Pentagon press briefing on May 4. Such a classification may be in violation of US law. Section 1.7 of Executive Order 12958 reads: “In no case shall information be classified in order to ... conceal violations of law, inefficiency, or administrative error [or to] prevent embarrassment to a person, organization, or agency ....” [Secrecy News, 5/5/2004]
People and organizations involved: Antonio M. Taguba, Peter Pace, US Congress, Donald Rumsfeld
          

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