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Profile: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)

 
  

Positions that Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK) has held:



 

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Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK) actively participated in the following events:

 
  

1970s      Plans to use force against Iran

       The Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), a militant Iranian political organization formed in the 1960s, kills US military personnel and US civilians working on defense projects in Tehran. [Sources: Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002, 4/30/2003]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

1979      Plans to use force against Iran

       The Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK) is expelled from Iran and takes refuge in Iraq. In exile, the group develops an overseas support structure and creates the National Liberation Army (NLA), which acquires tanks, armored vehicles, and heavy artillery. The group will receive support from Saddam Hussein until he is toppled by a US invasion in 2003 (see March 19, 2003). [Sources: Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002, 4/30/2003]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

Mid- to late- 1980s      Plans to use force against Iran

       With support from Saddam Hussein, the Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), a militant Iranian opposition group, joins Iraqi troops in fighting against the Iranians. [Christian Science Monitor, 12/31/2003 Sources: Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002, 4/30/2003]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

June 28, 1981      Plans to use force against Iran

       The Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), a militant Iranian opposition group, bombs the Islamic Republic Party headquarters and the Premier?s office, killing some 70 high-ranking Iranian officials, including chief Justice Ayatollah Mohammad Beheshti, President Mohammad-Ali Rajaei, and Premier Mohammad-Javad Bahonar. [Sources: Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002, 4/30/2003]
People and organizations involved: Seyyed Mohammad Hosseini Beheshti, Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), Mohammad-Javad Bahonar, Mohammad-Ali Rajaei
          

1991      Plans to use force against Iran

       The Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), a militant Iranian opposition group, helps Saddam Hussein suppress the Shia uprisings in southern Iraq and the Kurdish uprisings in the north. [Sources: Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002, 4/30/2003]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

April 1992      Plans to use force against Iran

       Various cells of Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), a militant Iranian opposition group, attack Iranian embassies and installations in 13 different countries. [Sources: Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002, 4/30/2003]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

August 1993      Plans to use force against Iran

       The National Council of Resistance, a front group for the Mujahedeen-e Khalq [MEK], elects Maryam Rajavi to serve as the interim president in Iran in the event that the mullahs are overthrown. She and her husband, Massoud, have headed the MEK since 1985. [Iran-e Azad website]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), Maryam Rajavi
          

1997      Plans to use force against Iran

       The US State Department includes the Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), a militant Iranian opposition group, in its list of foreign terrorist organizations. [US State Department, 2003; White House, 9/12/2002; Newsweek, 9/26/2002] MEK, which in English means, “People's Holy Warriors,” [Christian Science Monitor, 7/29/2004] is later described by its former members as a cult. Its husband-and-wife leaders, Massoud and Maryam Rajavi, exercise absolute control over the group's rank-and-file, requiring that members worship them and practice Mao-style self-denunciations. Many of the MEK's members are tricked into joining the group. For example, the parents of Roshan Amini will tell the Christian Science Monitor in 2003 that their son joined because he had been told he would be able to complete two school grades in one year and earn a place in college. But after joining, Amini was not permitted to leave. [Christian Science Monitor, 12/31/2003; Los Angeles Times, 12/5/2004]
People and organizations involved: Maryam Rajavi, Massoud Rajavi, Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

April 1999      Plans to use force against Iran

       The Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), a militant Iranian opposition group, assassinates the deputy chief of the Iranian Armed Forces General Staff. [Sources: Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002, 4/30/2003]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

Early 2000      Plans to use force against Iran

       US Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS) agents arrest Mahnaz Samadi, a leading spokeswoman for the National Council of Resistance, at the Canadian border because several years earlier, when she was seeking political asylum in the US, she had not disclosed her past “terrorist” ties as an MEK “military commander” or the fact that she had trained in an MEK camp that was located in Iraq. Hearing about the case from his constituents, Missouri Senator John Ashcroft comes to the rescue and writes a letter on May 10, 2000 to Attorney General Janet Reno opposing Samadi's arrest. In his letter, he calls her a “highly regarded human-rights activist.” [US State Department, 2003; Newsweek, 9/26/2002]
People and organizations involved: Mahnaz Samadi, Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), John Ashcroft
          

February 2000      Plans to use force against Iran

       The Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), a militant Iranian opposition group, launches a mortar attack against the leadership complex in Tehran where the offices of the Supreme Leader and the President are located. [Sources: Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002, 4/30/2003]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

April 2000      Plans to use force against Iran

       The Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), a militant Iranian opposition group, attempts to assassinate the commander of Nasr headquarters in Tehran, Iran's interagency board responsible for coordinating policies on Iraq. [Sources: Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002, 4/30/2003]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

September 2000      Plans to use force against Iran

       When the Iranian National Council of Resistance, a front group for the militant Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), holds a demonstration outside the United Nations protesting a speech by Iranian President Mohammed Khatami, Republican Senators Ashcroft and Chris Bond from Missouri issue a joint statement expressing solidarity with the organization. [US State Department, 2003; Newsweek, 9/26/2002]
People and organizations involved: National Council of Resistance, Chris Bond, John Ashcroft, Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

October, 2000      Plans to use force against Iran

       It is reported that two mortar bomb attacks occurred in Tehran, according to Iran's official Irna news agency. Iranian televsion describe the attack as an "indiscriminate act of terrorism." MEK issued statements saying it had staged mortar attacks on two separate headquarters of Iran's elite Revolutionary Guards. An attack by MEK in February on the offices of President Mohammad Khatami killed one man [BBC 10/22/2000]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

November 2, 2001      Plans to use force against Iran

       The British government add 25 groups to its list of organizations whose assets it wants to freeze as part of the fight against terrorism. The list includes Mujahedeen Khalq Organization (MEK), but makes the distinction that NCRI not be included. The U.S. State Department make no such distinction, claiming MEK are the militant wing and that they are the same organization. In an announcement, Secretary of State Colin Powell said he determined that the National Council of Resistance is an alias for the MEK. A State Department spokesman said the move was based on information from a variety of sources that the National Council of Resistance functioned "as a part of the MEK" and supported its acts of terrorism. [BBC 11/2/2001; Associated Press 8/15/03; GlobalSecurity 8/15/03]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

March, 2002      Plans to use force against Iran

       The conservative National Review publishes an op-ed article by Sam Dealy titled “A Very, Very Bad Bunch,” commenting on the Iranian opposition group known as People's Mujahedeen of Iran (MEK) and “its surprising American friends.” Dealy's piece is an attack on Congresspersons who support the MEK despite the exile group's past history of anti-Americanism (See 1970s and 1979). “How has a terrorist group managed to win the support of mainstream US politicians?” he asks. “Simple: Its political representatives in the US have worked hard to repackage the group as a legitimate dissident organization fighting for democracy in Iran—by whitewashing its record and duping our leaders.” Dealy emphasizes that the group's initial ideological underpinning had been influenced by the likes of Marx, Ho Chi Minh, and Che Guevara, whose ideas the MEK attempted to apply to Shiite society. [National Review Online, 3/25/2002]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

December, 2002      Plans to use force against Iran

       The Institute for Science and International Security release a report that Iran are constructing two nuclear facilities. The report claims the first facility near Arak is a heavy-water production facility. The ISIS say the are concerned because Iran might also be building a nuclear reactor moderated by heavy water. The report continues that the Bushehr nuclear reactor, which Iran is currently building with aid from Russia, does not use heavy water.
The ISIS report says that the satellite imagery appears to contradict claims made by the Iranian opposition group National Council of Resistance of Iran, who have claimed that Tehran is building a nuclear fuel fabrication facility at a site called Natanz, 25 miles southeast of the city of Kashan. The ISIS report describes that facility at Natanz as a non-opearating uranium enrichment plant, possibly employing gas centrifuge technology.[ Nuclear Threat Initiative, Issue 12/13/2002, ISIS, 12/12/2002 ]

Interviewed by CNN, Iran's U.N. Ambassador Javad Zarif said that his country is not developing nuclear weapons. "No. Absolutely not," Zarif said in response to a question on whether Iran is developing a nuclear weapons program. "Iran is a member of the [Nuclear] Nonproliferation Treaty. We have safeguard agreements with the IAEA. Nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction do not have a place in our defense doctrine. We have stated that clearly. And we have shown it," he added. [CNN, 12/13/2002]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)

          

2003      Plans to use force against Iran

       Iranian President Mohamed Khatami offers to hand over al-Qaeda leaders, including Saif Al Adel, the organization's third-ranking member, to the US government in exchange for the leaders of the Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), a militant Iranian exile group that has been launching attacks against the Iranian government since the 1970s. Iran says that rank-and-file MEK members who regret their involvement with the group would be “welcom[ed]” and judged “according to the law.” The US shows little interest in the offer. [New York Times, 8/2/2003; Christian Science Monitor, 12/31/2003; Christian Science Monitor, 7/29/2004]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), Hojjat ol-Eslam Seyyed Mohammad Khatami, Saif Al Adel
          

April 2003      Plans to use force against Iran

       The US orders the bombing of Mujahedeen-e Khalq's (MEK) camps in Iraq. But the orders are called off after the MEK voluntarily disarms and negotiates a cease-fire agreement with US authorities. The MEK will be held in US custody at Camp Ashraf, located roughly 60 miles north of Baghdad, and its members will be screened for war crimes and terrorism. [Los Angeles Times, 12/5/2004]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

June 23, 2003      Plans to use force against Iran

       France's Secret Service raids the compound of the Iranian terrorist opposition group, Mujahedeen e-Khalq (MEK), an anti-Iranian group that has been on the US State Department's list of Foreign Terrorist Organizations since 1997. Among those arrested are husband-and-wife leaders Maryam and Massoud Rajavi. Following the arrests, nine MEK members across Europe set themselves on fire in protest. At least three of the protesters die. Critics claim that the self-immolations were ordered by MEK's leadership. [Los Angeles Times, 12/5/2004]
People and organizations involved: Maryam Rajavi, Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), Massoud Rajavi
          

August 2003     

       The US government forces the Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK) to close its offices in Washington, D.C. [Christian Science Monitor, 7/29/2004]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

Aug 15th, 2003      Plans to use force against Iran

       A Press Statement is released by Tom Casey, Acting Spokesman for the U.S. Department of State titled: 'Designation of National Council of Resistance and National Council of Resistance of Iran under Executive Order 13224 (known as the MEK)' stating that the State Dept have "amended the designation, under Executive Order 13224 on terrorist financing, of the Mujahedin-e Khalq, known as the MEK, to add its aliases National Council of Resistance (NCR) and National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI). That Executive Order blocks the assets of organizations and individuals linked to terrorism." [U.S. State Dept Press Release, 8/15/2003.]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

August 31, 2003      Plans to use force against Iran

       Iran claims to have arrested dozens of spies. “The Intelligence Ministry has arrested several spies who were transferring Iran's nuclear secrets out of the country,” Yunsei says. But he provides few details about the identities of those arrested, other than to say that members of the armed opposition group Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK) played prominently in the operation. [Jerusalem Post, 8/31/03]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

December 2003      Plans to use force against Iran

       The US-appointed Iraq Governing Council orders the Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK) to leave Iraq by the end of year citing its “black history” in Iraq as a “terrorist organization,”—a reference to the militant organization's long history of working with Saddam Hussein (see 1991)(see December 2003). But Pentagon officials do not want the MEK to leave Iraq, as they are considering plans to use the group against Iran. [Christian Science Monitor, 12/31/2003]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), John Ashcroft
          

January, 2004      Plans to use force against Iran

       The Washington Post reports that "Pentagon adviser Richard N. Perle, a strong advocate of war against Iraq, spoke last weekend at a charity event that U.S. officials say may have had ties to an alleged terrorist group seeking to topple the Iranian government and backed by Saddam Hussein." Perle, also of AEI (American Enterprise Institute), said he was unaware of any involvement by the terrorist group, known as the Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), and believed he was assisting the victims of the Bam earthquake when he delivered the paid speech. "All of the proceeds will go to the Red Cross," Perle said. Informed that the Red Cross had announced before the event it would refuse any monies because of the event's "political nature," Perle said: "I was unaware of that." Perle declined to say how much he received. [Washington Post 1/29/2004]
People and organizations involved: Richard Perle, Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

January 24, 2004      Plans to use force against Iran

       Pentagon adviser Richard N. Perle speaks at a charity event ostensibly held to express “solidarity with Iran” and raise money for Iran earthquake victims. During the event, statements are made in support of “regime change in Iran.” The event is attended by FBI agents because of suspicions that the event has connections to the terrorist group, Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK). The US Treasury Department will freeze the assets of the event's prime organizer, the Iranian-American Community of Northern Virginia, on February 26. Perle later tells the Washington Post that he was unaware of the possible connections. [Washington Post 1/29/2004]
People and organizations involved: Richard Perle, Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

July 2004      Plans to use force against Iran

       After a 16-month review by the State Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Bush administration says it has found no basis to charge any of the 3,800 Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK) fighters being held in custody by the US at Camp Ashraf with violations of American law. The decision is made in spite of the group's long history of collusion with Saddam Hussein. MEK fought alongside Iraqi forces against Iran during the 1980s (see December 2003) and even helped Saddam's internal security forces brutally put down the 1991 Shia uprisings (see 1991). Additionally, the organization was responsible for a number of American deaths during the 1970s (see 1970s) and has been listed on the State Department's list of “foreign terrorist organizations” since 1997 (see 1997). “A member of a terrorist organization is not necessarily a terrorist,” a senior American official explains. “To take action against somebody, you have to demonstrate that they have done something.” [New York Times, 7/27/2004; Christian Science Monitor, 7/29/2004]
People and organizations involved: Bush administration, Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

July 21, 2004      Plans to use force against Iran

       Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller, the deputy commanding general in Iraq, says in a memorandum that the US has designated members of the Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK) as “protected persons.” According to the Fourth Geneva Convention, people who are designated as “protected” cannot be punished collectively or forced to leave an occupied country. The members were afforded the new status only after signing an agreement rejecting violence and terrorism, the memo says. [Christian Science Monitor, 7/29/2004; New York Times, 7/27/2004] Tehran responds angrily. “We already knew that America was not serious in fighting terrorism,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi says, adding that by affording MEK fighters the new status, the US has created a new category of “good terrorists.” “The American resort to the Geneva Conventions to support the terrorist hypocrites [MKO] is naive and unacceptable.” Despite the members' new status and despite having been cleared of any wrongdoing, the US military and the MEK leadership do not allow any of the group's members to leave. Several of the members were lured into joining the group with false promises and now want to return home to Iran. The MEK has been called cult-like (see January 2005) and its leadership compared to Stalin by former members of the group. [Christian Science Monitor, 12/31/2003; Christian Science Monitor, 7/29/2004]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), Geoffrey Miller
          

Dec 8th, 2004      Plans to use force against Iran

       It is reported by The Seattle Times that "... Mujahedeen Khalq (MEK), remains on the State Department's list of foreign terrorist groups, but it's provided much of the intelligence about Iran's weapons programs." [The Seattle Times, 12,8,2004]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

(Early 2005)      Plans to use force against Iran

       The US sends teams of US-trained former Iranian exiles, sometimes accompanied by US Special Forces, into southern and eastern Iran to search for underground nuclear installations. [New Yorker, 1/24/2005; United Press International, 1/26/2005 Sources: Vince Cannistraro, unnamed former high-level intelligence official interviewed by Seymour Hersh, unnamed serving and retired US intelligence officials interviewed by Richard Sale] In the north, Israeli-trained Kurds from northern Iraq, also occasionally assisted by US forces, look for signs of nuclear activity as well. [United Press International, 1/26/2005 Sources: unnamed serving and retired US intelligence officials interviewed by Richard Sale] Both teams are tasked with planting remote detection devices, known as “sniffers,” which can sense radioactive emissions and other indicators of nuclear-enrichment programs while also helping US warplanners establish targets. [New Yorker, 1/24/2005; United Press International, 1/26/2005 Sources: unnamed serving and retired US intelligence officials interviewed by Richard Sale, unnamed former high-level intelligence official interviewed by Seymour Hersh] The former Iranian exiles operating in the south and east are members of Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), a group that has been included in the State Department's list of foreign terrorist organizations since 1997 (see 1997) and included in a government white paper (see September 12, 2002) that criticized Iraq for its support of the group. After the US invaded Iraq, members of MEK were “consolidated, detained, disarmed, and screened for any past terrorist acts” by the US (see July 2004) and designated as “protected persons.” (see July 21, 2004) Initially, the MEK operate from Camp Habib in Basra, but they later launch their incursions from the Baluchi region in Pakistan. [United Press International, 1/26/2005 Sources: unnamed US officials interviewed by Richard Sale] They are assisted by information from Pakistani scientists and technicians who have knowledge of Iran's nuclear program. [New Yorker, 1/24/2005 Sources: unnamed former high-level intelligence official interviewed by Seymour Hersh] Pakistan apparently agreed to cooperate with the US in exchange for assurances that Pakistan would not have to turn Abdul Qadeer Khan, the so-called “father of Pakistan?s nuclear bomb,” to the IAEA or to any other international authorities for questioning. Khan, who is “linked to a vast consortium of nuclear-black-market activities,” could potentially be of great assistance to these agencies in their efforts to undermine nuclear weapons proliferation. [New Yorker, 1/24/2005 Sources: unnamed former high-level intelligence official interviewed by Seymour Hersh] In addition to allowing Pakistan to keep A.Q. Khan, the US looks the other way as Pakistan continues to buy parts for its nuclear-weapons arsenal in the black market, according to a former high-level Pakistani diplomat interviewed by Seymour Hersh [New Yorker, 1/24/2005] The United States' use of MEK is criticized by western diplomats and analysts who agree that many Iranians consider the group to be traitors, as they fought alongside Iraqi troops against Iran in the 1980s. [Christian Science Monitor, 12/31/2003]
People and organizations involved: Abdul Qadeer Khan, Bush administration, Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

January 29, 2005     

       Former US intelligence officials say they believe incursions into Iran are being carried out by Iranian rebels drawn from the anti-Tehran rebel group, the Mujahedeen-e Khalq, under US supervision. [Guardian 2/29/2005]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

February, 2005      Plans to use force against Iran

       MEK's latest release is made, the group passes on unverified information to the International Atomic Energy Administration (IAEA) that Iran now possesses sources for polonium-210 and beryllium, crucial components in building an initiator. The group claims that this is the last objective that Iran needed to fulfill and that they plan to have a nuclear weapon by the end of 2005.[ Associated Press, (Paris, France). AP.]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

Mid-February 2005      Plans to use force against Iran

       Newsweek interviews Maryam Rajavi, one of the leaders of Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), at the organization's compound in the French village of Auvers sur Oise. “I believe increasingly the Americans have come to realize that the solution is an Iranian force that is able to get rid of the Islamic fundamentalists in power in Iran,” Rajavi tells the magazine. She also insists that her group's history of anti-Americanism has long past. [Newsweek 2/15/2005]
People and organizations involved: Maryam Rajavi, Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

February 15, 2005      Plans to use force against Iran

       Newsweek publish the article "Looking for a Few Good Spies" MEK leader Maryam Rajavi is interviewed from her organization's compound in the French village of Auvers sur Oise "I believe increasingly the Americans have come to realize that the solution is an Iranian force that is able to get rid of the Islamic fundamentalists in power in Iran" says Rajavi. Newsweek comment that "Now the administration is seeking to cull useful MEK members as operatives for use against Tehran, all while insisting that it does not deal with the MEK as a group" Sources also reveal to Newsweek that the CIA is also resisting the recruitment of agents from the MEK because senior officers regard them as unreliable cultists under the sway of Rajavi and her husband. A Defense Department spokesman denied there is any "cooperation agreement" with the MEK and said the Pentagon has no plans to utilize MEK members in any capacity. "The Defense Department is thinking of them as buddies and the State Department sees them as terrorists. The truth is probably somewhere in the middle," says Rep. Brad Sherman, a Democrat from California. [Newsweek 2/15/2005]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), Maryam Rajavi
          

March 2005      Plans to use force against Iran

       More than 250 members of the Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK), a militant Iranian opposition group, return to Iran from Camp Ashraf in Iraq, accepting Iran's December offer of amnesty. For years, the MEK leadership have assured the group's members they faced certain death if they returned to Iran. Many remaining MEK members, over 3,500 in Iraq alone, say they are skeptical of the Iranian government's promises and [Christian Science Monitor, 3/22/2005] dismiss the defectors as “quitters.” According to the Los Angeles Times, which interviewed several of Camp Ashraf's residents in early 2005, remaining MEK members appear to “show no interest” in going back. [Los Angeles Times, 3/19/2005]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

March 19, 2005      Plans to use force against Iran

       The Los Angeles report that the CIA and FBI are both actively gleaning information from Iranians who have recently travelled to Iran in an attempt to learn more about Iran's nuclear ambitions and terrorist activities. Reza Pahlavi, the heir to the Iranian Peacock throne, holds meetings in the Los Angeles area with activists who arrive from as far away as Paris (MEK), it is reported. With the sudden spotlight on Iran competing dissident groups are competing for relevance for the ear of the Bush administration. Gary Sick, who served on the National Security Council under presidents Ford, Carter and Reagan dismisses the analysis of the community "They despise the mullahs. They want to see them gone. And I think their wishful thinking overcomes rational analysis." Meanwhile, Reuel Marc Gerecht comments that some of the information may be of use. An unnamed Bush administration acknowledges talking to the various groups "Some of the meetings are just, 'Let's see what they've got to say." [Los Angeles Times, 3/19/2005]
People and organizations involved: Reuel Marc Gerecht, Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

March 22, 2005      Plans to use force against Iran

       Some 250 members of Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK) return to Iran, accepting Iran's December offer of amnesty. For years MEK leadership assured its members they faced certain death if they returned to Iran. Many remaining MEK members, over 3500 in Iraq alone, remained skeptical. The Los Angeles Times reported that the MEK dismissed the defectors as "quitters," and that those remaining "show no interest" in going back. [Christian Science Monitor, 3/22/2005]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

March 31, 2005      Plans to use force against Iran

       MEK's political wing, the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), hold a press conference in Paris. Mohammad Mohaddessin of the NCRI told a news conference in Paris "In mid-2004, Khamenei allocated $2.5 billion to obtain three nuclear warheads" Mohaddessin claimed the Iranian regime was speeding up work on a reactor in Arak, 150 miles south of Tehran, which could produce enough plutonium for one atomic bomb per year. "The regime told the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) the reactor would be operational in 2014, but in reality, they want to start it in 2006 or 2007," he said. The NCRI revealed the Arak heavy-water production plant, along with the Natanz uranium enrichment plant, in August 2002, describing it as part of a secret nuclear weapons program. Iran later declared both sites to the IAEA. [Reuters, 3/31/05; MIPT Terrorism Knowledge Base]
People and organizations involved: Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK)
          

'Passive' participant in the following events:

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