The Center for Cooperative Research
U:     P:    
Not registered yet? Register here
 
Search
 
Advanced Search


Main Menu
Home 
History Engine Sub-Menu
Timelines 
Entities 
Forum 
Miscellaneous Sub-Menu
Donate 
Links 
End of Main Menu

Volunteers Needed!
Submit a timeline entry
Donate: If you think this site is important, please help us out financially. We need your help!
Email updates
 


Click here to join: Suggest changes to existing data, add new data to the website, or compile your own timeline. More Info >>

 

Profile: General Accounting Office

 
  

Positions that General Accounting Office has held:



 

Quotes

 
  

No quotes or excerpts for this entity.


 

Relations

 
  

Related Entities:


 

General Accounting Office actively participated in the following events:

 
  

July 16, 2001      Bush's environmental record

       A study conducted by the General Accounting Office (GAO) finds that the scientists and experts who sit on the Science Advisory Board panels which advise the EPA often have ties to the affected industries or other conflicts of interest. The study, requested by Rep. Henry A. Waxman (Calif.), says that EPA officials regularly fail to identify potential conflicts of interest when panel members are chosen and do not adequately disclose the existence of such conflicts to the public. Though it is prohibited for a federal employee to participate in any “particular matter” that could affect their financial interests, there is an exemption that permits special government employees to serve on advisory panels when the topic being studied directly affects the financial interests of their employer—as long as the employer is not “singularly affected.” [The Washington Post, 7/16/01]
People and organizations involved: Henry A. Waxman, General Accounting Office
          

July 27, 2001      911 Environmental Impact

       The General Accounting Office (GAO) issues a report on the National Ombudsman's office at the request of the Chairman of the House Sub-Committee on Environment and Hazardous Materials. [US Senate, 6/25/2002; House Sub-Committee on Environment and Hazardous Materials, 7/16/2002] The report criticizes the EPA's January guidance (see January 3, 2001) and concludes that the EPA's national and regional ombudsmen do not have sufficient autonomy. [The Washington Post, 11/29/2001] The GAO report recommends the following:
Strengthen the ombudsman's independence by moving the office outside of the solid waste program;
Provide the ombudsman with a separate budget and staff;
Increase the ombudsman's accountability by requiring the office to develop specific criteria for its investigations. [Sources: GAO, 7/27/2001]
People and organizations involved: General Accounting Office
          

October 21, 2002: 13 Hijackers Were Never Interviewed by US Consular Officials      Complete 911 Timeline

       The General Accounting Office, the nonpartisan investigative arm of Congress, releases a report asserting that at least 13 of the 19 9/11 hijackers were never interviewed by US consular officials before being granted visas to enter the US. This contradicts previous assurances from the State Department that 12 of the hijackers had been interviewed. It also found that, for 15 hijackers whose applications could be found, none had filled in the documents properly. Records for four other hijackers (the four non-Saudis, including Ziad Jarrah and Mohamed Atta) could not be checked because they were accidentally destroyed. [Washington Post, 10/22/02] The State Department maintains that visa procedures were properly followed. In December 2002, Senators Jon Kyl (R) and Pat Roberts (R) state in a report that “if State Department personnel had merely followed the law and not granted non-immigrant visas to 15 of the 19 hijackers in Saudi Arabia ... 9/11 would not have happened.” [Associated Press, 12/19/02]
People and organizations involved: General Accounting Office, Jon Kyl, US Department of State, Pat Roberts, Mohamed Atta, Ziad Jarrah
          

July 2004      US Military

       The Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports to Congress on the challenges facing the development of the Global Information Grid (GIG). GIG, sometimes referred to as the “war net,” is the military's “Internet in the sky” (see February 25, 2004) that will give soldiers in the field unprecedented access to data, such as images, maps, and other types of actionable intelligence, via a very high-speed satellite link in real-time. In addition to a variety of management and operational challenges, GAO reports that most of the technologies needed to develop GIG are immature and that the Defense Department “is at risk of not delivering required capabilities within budgeted resources.” For example, “two key GIG related programs—JTRS and TSAT—are facing schedule and performance risks, ... largely rooted in attempts to move these programs into product development without sufficient knowledge that their technologies can work as intended.” Additionally, reports GAO, the Pentagon's Future Combat Systems program “is at significant risk, in part because more than 75 percent of its critical technologies were immature at the start and many will not be sufficiently mature until the production decision.” [The New York Times, 11/13/2004 Sources: The Global Information Grid and Challenges Facing Its Implementation, 7/2004]
People and organizations involved: US Congress, General Accounting Office
          

'Passive' participant in the following events:

Except where otherwise noted, the textual content of each timeline is licensed under the Creative Commons License below:

Creative Commons License Home |  About this Site |  Development |  Donate |  Contact Us
Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Use