The Center for Cooperative Research
U:     P:    
Not registered yet? Register here
 
Search
 
Advanced Search


Main Menu
Home 
History Engine Sub-Menu
Timelines 
Entities 
Forum 
Miscellaneous Sub-Menu
Donate 
Links 
End of Main Menu

Volunteers Needed!
Submit a timeline entry
Donate: If you think this site is important, please help us out financially. We need your help!
Email updates
 


Click here to join: Suggest changes to existing data, add new data to the website, or compile your own timeline. More Info >>

 

Profile: New Orleans Superdome

 
  

Positions that New Orleans Superdome has held:



 

Quotes

 
  

No quotes or excerpts for this entity.


 

Relations

 
  

No related entities for this entity.


 

New Orleans Superdome actively participated in the following events:

 
  

(12:00 pm) August 28, 2005: City, FEMA, Scramble for Buses to Transport New Orleans Residents to Superdome      Hurricane Katrina

       Throughout this afternoon and evening, Regional Transit Authority (RTA) and some school buses will run between the designated pick-up areas and the Superdome throughout the afternoon and evening. “They're using school buses and about everything they can find to get people out of here,” reports French Quarter resident Rob Ramsey. [Times-Picayune, 8/28/2005] Nagin will later explain that the plan is to get people to higher ground: “Get them out of their homes, which—most people are under sea level—Get them to a higher ground and then depending upon our state and federal officials to move them out of harm's way after the storm has hit.” [NBC Meet The Press, 9/11/2005] Neither the number of buses deployed by the city, nor the number of people successfully evacuated on city buses, is known at this time. In the days to come, after publication of a photo showing hundreds of flooded buses, many will question why the city failed to use these buses to evacuate more people. [See, e.g., MSNBC, 9/6/2005] However, as Mayor Nagin will later note, “Sure, there was lots of buses out there. But guess what? You can't find drivers that would stay behind with a Category 5 hurricane, you know, pending down on New Orleans. We barely got enough drivers to move people on Sunday, or Saturday and Sunday, to move them to the Superdome. We barely had enough drivers for that. So sure, we had the assets, but the drivers just weren't available.” [NBC Meet The Press, 9/11/2005] In fact, officials at all levels of government:
(a) know that that many residents will need transportation
(b) know that local officials do not have sufficient resources to evacuate all residents who lack transportation ; and
(c) fail to dispatch the number of buses necessary for the evacuation. [Boston Globe, 9/11/2005; Baton Rouge Advocate, 9/09/2005; Dallas Morning News, 8/29/2005, pp A1] In short, officials at all levels of government are seeking buses; and officials at all levels of government fail to use the fleet of buses in the city that will be flooded during the hurricane. [MSNBC, 9/6/2005]
Note 1 - MSBNC will later report that it has obtained a draft emergency plan prepared by FEMA, which calls for “400 buses to ... evacuate victims.” [MSNBC, 9/6/2005] More details regarding this plan are not yet known.
Note 2 - It is unclear whether Passey's post-hurricane statement refers to buses requested before the hurricane or after. However, his report that FEMA is scrambling for buses occurs sometime prior to August 29, when it is reported in the Dallas Morning News. Regardless of which bus request (i.e., pre- or post-hurricane) Passey is referencing, it is undisputed that, along with the city and state, FEMA was scrambling for buses pre-hurricane, and that, along with the city and state, FEMA failed to deploy the many city school buses that will be flooded due to the hurricane.
Note 3 - Although not yet clear, it may be that officials elect to stage people at the Superdome because of their inability to deploy sufficient buses, in order to maximize the number of people that can be evacuated from low-lying neighborhoods in the hours leading up to the storm. Had officials used the available buses to transport people out of the city via the clogged interstates, the total number of people evacuated necessarily would have been much smaller. Each bus likely could make only a single run. Instead, the buses can make multiple trips from pickup areas to the Superdome.
People and organizations involved: Regional Transit Authority, New Orleans Superdome, Rob Ramsey, Ray Nagin
          

Afternoon August 28, 2005: Superdome Begins to Fill      Hurricane Katrina

       By this afternoon, several thousand residents have made their way to the Superdome, many dropped off by city buses that are looping between the dome and the pickup sites throughout the city. Residents with medical illnesses or disabilities are directed to one side of the dome, which is equipped with supplies and medical personnel. The remaining residents pour into the other side. “The people arriving on this side of the building are expected to fend for themselves,” says Terry Ebbert, the city's Homeland Security Director, although he does notes that the city has water for the evacuees. National Guard soldiers, New Orleans police, and civil sheriff's deputies patrol the dome. Officials expect that the Superdome's field will flood, and that it will lose power early tomorrow morning. However, Ebbert says, “I'm not worried about what is tolerable or intolerable. I'm worried about, whether you are alive on Tuesday.” [Times-Picayune, 8/29/2005]
People and organizations involved: Terry Ebbert, Louisiana National Guard, New Orleans Superdome
          

Late Evening August 28, 2005: Superdome Official Request Portable Toilets, Says Cannot Accommodate Thousands for Four Days      Hurricane Katrina

       Doug Thorton, General Manager of the Superdome has requested portable toilets, recognizing that the water pressure may fail, according to an Associated Press report. He also notes that they are not set up to manage the thousands of evacuees for very long: “We're expecting to be here for the long haul,” he said. “We can make things very nice for 75,000 people for four hours. But we aren't set up to really accommodate 8,000 for four days.”
People and organizations involved: New Orleans Superdome, Doug Thornton
          

(8:00 am) August 29, 2005: Katrina's Winds Tears Hole in Roof of Superdome      Hurricane Katrina

       Katrina's winds tear two sections from the roof of the Superdome, and rain begins to pour in through the holes, where thousands of New Orleans residents have sought refuge from the storm, was damaged and there are reports of water pouring into the building. [Times-Picayune Blog, 8/29/2005]
People and organizations involved: Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans Superdome
          

'Passive' participant in the following events:

Except where otherwise noted, the textual content of each timeline is licensed under the Creative Commons License below:

Creative Commons License Home |  About this Site |  Development |  Donate |  Contact Us
Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Use