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Profile: Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

 
  

Positions that Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has held:



 

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Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) actively participated in the following events:

 
  

September 27, 2001      Environmental Impact

       After USGS scientists complete their analysis of the dust samples collected in New York City (see September 17, 2001-September 19, 2001-) —which found asbestos, an “alphabet soup of heavy metals,” and an extremely high pH level (see September 20, 2001) —the team emails the results to “all the government contacts the team had” including people at the EPA and FEMA, as well as to the federal emergency response coordinator. The EPA never informs the public of the dust's high pH. “We anticipated that the results would have been shared with the people on the ground, those at risk, but it looks like the information never got to those who needed it,” Geoffrey Plumlee, a geochemist, will later tell the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. [St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 2/10/02; St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 2/10/02 (B)] Some scientists will suggest that the dust's high pH is a major cause of what will come to be known as the “WTC cough” (see September 9, 2002).
People and organizations involved: Environmental Protection Agency, US Geological Service (USGS), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)  Additional Info 
          

February 23, 2002      Environmental Impact

       The EPA's National Ombudsman's office convenes a hearing on the environmental issues that resulted from the attacks on the World Trade Center. Hugh Kaufman, the EPA ombudsman's chief investigator, remarks during the hearing that he believes the EPA, as well as state and city officials, have intentionally utilized inferior testing methods in order to avoid finding evidence that environmental conditions threaten public health. “I believe EPA did not do that because they knew it would come up not safe and so they are involved in providing knowingly false information to the public about safety,” Kaufman, says. “Not just EPA, the state and the city, too. We also had testimonies that all the agencies—local, state, and federal—have been consorting together every week to discuss these issues.” [CNN, 2/24/02] Numerous experts testify at the hearing, criticizing the EPA's response to the September 11 attacks, including David Newman, an industrial hygienist with the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH); Dr. Thomas Cahill, of the University of California at Davis; Marjorie J. Clarke, PhD, an adjunct professor at Lehman and Hunter College, City University of New York; Alison Johnson, Chairman of the Chemical Sensitivity Foundation, among others. Government officials and employees were invited to participate—including officials from the EPA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the US Geological Survey, the governor's office, state agencies, the mayor's office and city agencies—but did not appear. “This is the first time this has happened in this type of hearing,” Hugh Kaufman, tells United Press International. [Newsmax, 2/24/2002 Sources: Transcripts of EPA National Ombudsman Hearing on EPA response to WTC contamination, 2/21/2002]
People and organizations involved: Thomas Cahill, Cate Jenkins, PhD., Marjorie J. Clarke, PhD, Hugh Kaufman, Jerrold Nadler, Environmental Protection Agency, Alison Johnson, US Geological Service (USGS), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
          

February 2003      Environmental Impact

       Congress passes the 2003 omnibus spending package which contains approximately $90 million to monitor the health of workers who took part in the World Trade Center recovery effort. But the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which controls the money, delays giving the funds to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because of a dispute over how to distribute the aid. [New York Daily News, 6/10/03]
People and organizations involved: Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
          

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