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Profile: Roger King

 
  

Positions that Roger King has held:

  • Military spokesperson in Afghanistan


 

Quotes

 
  

Quote, March 14, 2003

   “We do force people to stand for an extended period of time.... Disruption of sleep has been reported as an effective way of reducing people's inhibition about talking or their resistance to questioning._They are not allowed to speak to one another. If they do, they can plan together or rely on the comfort of one another. If they're caught speaking out of turn, they can be forced to do things—like stand for a period of time—as payment for speaking out.” [Associated Press, 3/14/03]

Associated Events


 

Relations

 
  

No related entities for this entity.


 

Roger King actively participated in the following events:

 
  

(Early 2003)      Torture in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

       Abdul Qayyum, an Afghan, is captured by US forces and detained for two months and five days. He is held in a large hall with about 100 other prisoners. The hall is divided into cubicles cordoned off with sheets of wire mesh. Each cubicle contains 10 people. Rahman later complains to the Associated Press that he was subjected to sleep deprivation, was forced to stand for long periods of time, and endured humiliating verbal abuse from female soldiers who screamed at him from outside his cell. [Associated Press, 3/14/03] When the Associated Press asks the US military about Qayyum's detention and that of another detainee (see (February 2003)), spokesman Roger King denies that the two Afghans were tortured, saying that for the most part, their accounts are “completely bogus.”
People and organizations involved: Roger King, Abdul Qayyum
          

(February 2003)      Torture in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

       Saif-ur Rahman, an Afghan who has been fighting against the Taliban, is taken prisoner by US troops in Kunar. He is first taken to Jalalabad, where two US soldiers throw a bucket of ice-cold water on him as he stands naked in his cell on a sheet of ice. Later, he is forced to lie naked spread-eagle on a sheet of ice with chairs placed on his hands and feet. For 20 straight days, Rahman is handcuffed, except for at mealtime when his constraints are relaxed. Rahman later complains to the Associated Press that he was subjected to sleep deprivation, was forced to stand for long periods of time, and endured humiliating verbal abuse from female soldiers who screamed at him from outside his cell. [Associated Press, 3/14/03] When the Associated Press asks the US military about Rahman's detention and that of another detainee (see (Early 2003)), spokesman Roger King denies that the two Afghans were tortured, saying that for the most part, their accounts are “completely bogus.”
People and organizations involved: Saif-ur Rahman, Roger King
          

March 14, 2003      Torture in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere

       When an Associated Press reporter asks the US military to comment on the accounts of two former Afghan detainees (see (Early 2003)) (see (February 2003)), spokesman Roger King claims their accounts are mostly untrue. “Some of the stuff they are saying sounds like partial truths, some of it's completely bogus,” he says. “They were stripped naked probably to prevent them from sneaking weapons into the facility. That's why someone may be stripped.... We do force people to stand for an extended period of time.... Disruption of sleep has been reported as an effective way of reducing people's inhibition about talking or their resistance to questioning....They are not allowed to speak to one another. If they do, they can plan together or rely on the comfort of one another. If they're caught speaking out of turn, they can be forced to do things—like stand for a period of time—as payment for speaking out.” [Associated Press, 3/14/03]
People and organizations involved: Roger King
          

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